DnD 5E Complete Guide to Spell Scrolls - Tabletop Builds (2022)

Author: pandaniel

“Should I use my spell scroll?” you think to yourself. “We might fight an even bigger giant robotic crab after this…”

Spell scrolls are a consumable item in D&D 5E which allow you to cast different spells. Some are found in dungeons, whereas others might be bought. They are often left unused, forgotten about and collecting dust at the bottom of the party’s inventory, or hoarded until the end of the campaign.

We believe spell scrolls should be used more. This guide will discuss how to use and obtain spell scrolls, as well as why you should seek them out, and what kinds of spell scrolls you should be looking for. Hopefully this will show you why scrolls are great, and that you should actually use scrolls as often as you can!

DnD 5E Complete Guide to Spell Scrolls - Tabletop Builds (1)

Spell Scroll Usage

A spell scroll contains a single spell which is only readable and usable if the spell is on whatever spell list that is used by your class. For a Cleric this would mean the spell must be on the Cleric spell list, whereas an Arcane Trickster Rogue requires the spell to be on the Wizard spell list. You can cast its spell without providing any material components by reading it using the scribed spell’s normal casting time. The scroll’s spell level determines its DC or bonus to attack.

If the spell is of a higher level than you can normally cast, you must make an ability check using your Spellcasting ability modifier to determine whether you cast it successfully. The DC equals 10 + the spell’s level. On a failed check, the spell disappears from the scroll with no other effect.

A variant rule which adds to the consequences of failing this check is Scroll Mishaps. Once you fail, you have to make a DC 10 Intelligence saving throw, and if you fail you roll on the Scroll Mishaps table. This table sounds worse than it is, as you would have already wasted the scroll anyway, it happens quite infrequently (you need to fail the check and the save) and most of its effects are not too awful. In general we recommend against using spell scrolls of a higher level than you can cast except when it is absolutely necessary anyway, and this variant rule is a negligible factor in that assessment.

Obtaining Spell Scrolls

(Video) Scrolls are IMPORTANT to make in D&D 5E!

You can obtain spell scrolls from looting defeated enemies or in treasure hoards and the like, or you can scribe scrolls yourself. You either get a spell scroll of your DM’s choice in something like a treasure hoard or you yourself create one. If your DM is using the Dungeon Master’s Guide treasure tables, spell scrolls will appear roughly as often as potions of healing. Obtaining scrolls this way is fairly reliable in quantity, but not quality: the choice of spell is obviously going to be randomized, so it’s somewhat difficult to work with.

Scribing scrolls yourself is more reliable, as you can pick the spell you want to scribe. Scribing a Spell Scroll is a downtime activity described in Xanathar’s Guide To Everything (XGE) which can take anywhere from 1 day to 48 workweeks and costs between 15 and 250,000 gp depending on the level of spell you want to scribe. To scribe a spell scroll you need to have the spell prepared, or it must be among your known spells, which is different from using the scroll, which only requires that you have the spell on your class’ spell list. Additionally you need to have proficiency in the Arcana skill and provide the material components that the spell requires.

No matter your world’s calendar, mechanically a workweek means 5 days. Each day that you want to count towards finishing your scroll you are required to spend at least 8 hours engaged in scribing your spell. The good thing is that these days do not have to be consecutive. The amount of time you can take off can however not be more than twice the time required, i.e. you are allowed to have a total break time of 5 days for scribing a spell that takes 3 days to finish.

Depending on whether your table sees scribing down spell scrolls as light activity, you could get more out of your day if you also want to progress scribing down a spell. As part of a long rest you can spend two hours performing light activity, or eight hours for a Pact of the Tome Warlock with the Aspect of the Moon Invocation, which would be a great way to free up more time for adventuring.

Another way to allow for more time adventuring is through the Order of Scribes’ level 10 feature: Master Scrivener. This feature allows you to halve the gold and time you must spend to make spell scroll. An elf could make a scroll every long rest while others are dreaming! That is the dream… if elves dreamt. Similarly, the Artificer’s Magic Item Adept feature reduces the crafting time for magic items with a rarity of common or uncommon to a quarter of its typical crafting time, and halves the cost. This also applies to spell scrolls of up to 3rd level.

What is the Appeal of Scrolls?

The first and foremost benefit is the conservation of resources, i.e. spell slots. While the creation of spell scrolls costs both money and time, there is little reason not to scribe good spells down for later use if you can afford them. Capitalizing on spell slots you conserved to better prepare yourself for challenging future adventuring days is the same principle as rest casting, but over a longer period of time. D&D is a game of resources, and the better you can use them, the better your character will feel in play.

Compared to items like pearls of power or spell gems, spell scrolls are cheap, more reliably accessible, and lack the attunement requirement, making them a significantly more appealing option if available.

Warlock is a prime example of a class that is great at utilizing spell scrolls. Most lower level spells for Warlock quickly become redundant or outclassed by other options, but this does not mean they are bad spells. Examples for this will follow later.

Another similar case is the Paladin, but with different reasons to use scrolls. Paladins have a limited amount of spell slots, which many people would call “smite slots,” but we at Tabletop Builds disagree with this notion, as spells can be incredibly powerful. Smite might sometimes be good, but spells should never be disregarded. However, if Paladins get the ability to cast these spells without spell slots through spell scrolls, this is a win-win, as you can do more of both!

Secondly, scribing down spells can help out your party in a couple of ways. One way to do this would be to scribe scrolls for your fellow players that make use of things like ritual books, tomes and spellbooks, as they could copy them down to add them to their repertoire for repeated use. Another way would be to create scrolls for people that have the spells in their spell list, but not known or prepared, as this too could add to their abilities.

(Video) Creating Magical Items! (GM Tips w/ Matt Mercer)

Thirdly—this is especially the case for prepared casters—scribing scrolls can allow you to swap out niche spells, or ones that you do not use often for better options. This is a harder pill to swallow for known casters, as it might be quite a while before you can cast these spells again if you run out of spell scrolls, but for prepared casters this should really be something you keep in mind. We’ll list out a bunch of options in the next section.

Last but not least is a fun side benefit of scrolls; they cannot be counterspelled as spells from magical items don’t require any components except if stated otherwise! Counterspell states you take the reaction when you see a creature within 60 feet of you casting a spell, but this is impossible when components aren’t used, as with spell scrolls. This might not often come up, but it is very nice, especially if your DM is known for counterspelling your party casting revivify. For the rules on magic items see the Dungeon’s Master Guide (p. 141), and for spell perceiving Xanathar’s Guide to Everything (p. 85).

Which Spells to Scribe

The level of spell scrolls that you should acquire depend heavily on the type of game you play in. One table might frequently allow you to have a day of downtime, whereas another might often have months and another almost none at all. In general, we would recommend against trying to get spells of a higher level than 3 as the price and time spent grow exponentially. Spells up to and including 3rd level are still reasonably affordable, and hopefully your game will allow you to spend some time on creating them.

Additionally, every workweek you spend on a downtime activity brings a 10% chance of a complication. There is an example complication table provided in XGE on which can be rolled, but a DM can also select an option or create their own. The sample complications have a one out of six chance that your spell instead becomes a random spell of the same level, which means that the higher level spell you have, the higher chance you have to get a wrong spell. Below is a summary.

DnD 5E Complete Guide to Spell Scrolls - Tabletop Builds (2)

Most 1st level spells are worth being scribed down. Of course, we cannot and do not want to list everything, so keep in mind that this list is not exhaustive, and just mentions some big highlights. Most of these highlights won’t include spells with a save DC or attack roll at all, as these will not be based on your own spellcasting ability but are predetermined by the level of the spell and should generally be avoided, but a few exceptions will be made.

Shield: As stated previously, Warlock especially gets a lot out of spell scrolls because of their limited spell slots that are all high level. A Warlock with The Hexblade Otherworldly Patron or one that has dipped some levels into something like Divine Soul Sorcerer gets great mileage out of shield scrolls (other casters do too, shield is pretty neat!). Shield never loses its great potency, but it is hard to decide to use one of your three synaptic static slots on shield. (Remember that casting a spell from a spell scroll takes the spell’s normal casting time.)

Silvery barbs: An incredible spell which we have fully detailed here. First level spell slots are getting tighter and tighter with new spells being introduced, so having some scrolls on hand helps alleviate some of that. As you’ll likely have another caster in your party who can use a scroll of this, you can even help each other out by sharing your scrolls amongst each other.

Hex: Another Warlock example: hex is generally seen as a bad spell to use spell slots on here at Tabletop Builds, but Warlocks have quite a lot of spells they can prepare, and hex without having to use a slot is not completely terrible if you do not have better things to concentrate on like hypnotic pattern or summon greater demon. (However, do keep in mind that you can also start your mornings with killing an insect with hex and eldritch blast and short resting to get this slot back while keeping up your concentration, but a scroll is more flexible.)

(Video) 5e Starting Gold - Ultimate Guide for Dungeons and Dragons

Expeditious retreat: Like hex, this can be a good bonus action when you aren’t using your concentration or don’t want to use another leveled spell. These are situations where you have already cast synaptic static in round one, and need a better angle for your Repelling Blast or when you see the ability to default kill or kite creatures with your now superior movement.

Mage armor: While we normally would recommend you to pick up an armor proficiency through some other means, mage armor is a good spell if this is not doable for your Wizards or Sorcerers. You should first try to just rest cast this spell, but a day of adventuring could take longer than 8 hours, and using 25 gp for a solid boost in AC for the rest of the day is quite worthwhile.

Gift of alacrity: Another good option, though limited to the Wildemount-specific Arcane Traditions of Chronurgy and Graviturgy. This option is quite similar to mage armor where you should usually just rest cast it, but again, in some days this is not something you can accomplish. Technically, for the purpose of using this spell scroll you would run into issues with Rules as Written. Dunamancy spells are not added to your class’ spell list when you are part of either of these Arcane Traditions, even though you can prepare them, and thus the spell scroll would be unusable by you. This seems like an oversight, but talk to your DM whether they would actually allow you to cast this spell after scribing it down (if they don’t, please don’t scribe them either).

Longstrider: Longstrider is a solid 1 hour long non-concentration buff to your movement. Simple and easy to use.

Goodberry: Scribing a goodberry scroll costs the same amount as crafting a potion of healing (and will generally cost less than purchasing one) but is the superior option when used out of combat, healing 10 hit points guaranteed versus 7 on average from the potion.

Another difference is that by Rules as Written, a berry cannot be fed to an ally, whereas a potion of healing can be administered. Your DM might rule it differently though, which would allow you to revive unconscious creatures. For that purpose, the healing difference between 7 average hit points from the potion or 1 hit point from a single berry hardly matters.

Absorb elements: A great spell, and even better when you do not need to use spell slots to use it. One issue that might arise, here and with other reaction spells, like shield, is that you need to be able to read the scroll to use it. If you do not have a free hand to do this, you can remedy this problem by, for example, attaching your spell scroll to your shield or staff or the like. If you have both silvery barbs and shield already, you might not be getting to use this much.

Bless: Clerics and Paladins can make good use of bless scrolls. Clerics get their first level spell slots opened up to cast command more often, and Paladins can actually use their slots for Divine Smite without feeling bad about it. If you have a Cleric in your party with proficiency in Arcana, and you are playing a Paladin, you could even offload the responsibility of scribing to them alone. However, multiple people scribing spells is not bad either.

Healing word: Another direction to look at for Clerics is healing word. Healing word is a spell we generally already recommend against upcasting anyway, so just spending the time and money to get this at first level is not an issue. Additionally, if you have 10 of these, you can also just pick any other great spell on the Cleric spell list instead, as it no longer needs to clog up your prepared spells for the off chance someone goes unconscious. An additional spell prepared is worth a lot more than a few gold pieces and time if they are available to you (the same idea works for something like a Druid).

Web, entangle: For our first mentions of spells that actually require you to look at the Spell Scroll table for Save DCs and Attack Bonuses are two great control spells: web and entangle, which when scribed both have a save DC of 13. Web and entangle are both really efficient spells. While the save DC of 13 is most likely going to be lower than your normal spellcasting save DC once you leave tier 1, being able to use spells like these basically as a cantrip is quite strong. Similar to healing word, entangle can be really good in certain situations, but the Druid spell list is abundant with great options, and you’ll often not be able to prepare everything you want (just take a look at our Druid Basic Build, which constantly swaps between removing and adding the same spells). Creating a batch of scrolls of entangle can be a really good way to be conservative with both your spell slots and your spell preparations for later tiers of play.

Pass without trace: A great party-wide buff spell for a variety of situations, pass without trace is an incredible spell, and the ability to cast it for 250 gp and no spell slots makes it even better. Every party should have pass without trace, and getting scrolls for it is worth their weight in gold.

Misty step: Misty step, like healing word, can be pretty good at the right place at the right time, but with good positioning you won’t need this too often. This is a spell you should be swapping out as a Warlock once you have enough spell scrolls for it. Wizards can get away with just preparing it again once they run out, and therefore don’t need that many.

Lesser restoration: A spell that’s a tough sell to keep prepared constantly, but extremely useful in niche situations describes lesser restoration perfectly, making it a great candidate for scribing. If you need lesser restoration, your situation is probably quite dire, and having the scrolls on hand after swapping this one out can be a lifesaver, literally. Better be safe than sorry.

(Video) How to Craft Healing Potions for D&D 5e

Revivify: For the same reasons as un-preparing healing word or lesser restoration, revivify is probably not something you will cast every adventuring day, and thus it’s quite the no-brainer to keep scrolls of it in stock. If your DM is rolling on the Scribe a Scroll Complications table, there is a small chance that you lose your diamonds without getting a scroll of revivify, but the chance to get the correct scroll is about 98%, so the risk is worth it, unless you are extremely strapped for cash.

Conclusion

Spell scrolls, unlike most magical items, are a way to increase your party’s resources that you can control, for the most part.

You can get spell scrolls by finding them, crafting them, or even buying them if your game happens to have shops for them.

You can craft spell scrolls by scribing them, something which can only be done when you have proficiency in Arcana. Remember that D&D is not a solitary game, so think about your fellow players and how you can support them. We strongly recommend you to take a look at Arcana when you decide what skill proficiencies you want on your next spellcaster character, as getting spell scrolls is not just something that can benefit you, but your friends as well! Proficiency in Arcana can easily be fitting for pretty much any caster, so go wild!

As a last note for all of you who prefer watching videos over reading: our good friend Pack Tactics has created his own rendition of this article in an audio and video format over on his channel. If you haven’t already, go check him out!

(Video) How To Play A College Of Lore Bard in Dungeons and Dragons 5e

FAQs

How long does it take to make a spell scroll 5e? ›

Scribing a Spell Scroll is a downtime activity described in Xanathar's Guide To Everything (XGE) which can take anywhere from 1 day to 48 workweeks and costs between 15 and 250,000 gp depending on the level of spell you want to scribe.

Do you need material components for spell scrolls? ›

A spell scroll bears the words of a single spell, written in a mystical cipher. If the spell is on your class's spell list, you can read the scroll and cast its spell without providing any material Components.

Do you have to concentrate on spell scrolls 5e? ›

Yes, they still require your Concentration. The scroll replaces the material components, but you still have to cast the spell.

Are scrolls used up in 5e? ›

Success or failure, the scroll is destroyed—parchment and all. This means that you must choose to either read the spell to cast it or copy it. You cannot do both, as the spell is consumed in both cases. A spell scroll cannot be copied into a spellbook if the copier cannot yet prepare spells at its level.

Do scrolls last forever flicker? ›

Scrolls are one of the features in Flicker that were added on April 25th, 2021. Scrolls can be used to increase a chance of being a certain role in the next round(s). After you equip a certain-role scroll and get that role (while the scroll is in use), they disappear from your inventory.

Can you counterspell a spell scroll? ›

If the spell is on your class's spell list, you can use an action to read the scroll and cast the spell without having to provide any of the spell's components. Thus, if someone is visibly casting a spell from a scroll within 60 feet of a counterspelling wizard, the spell from the scroll can be countered.

Can scrolls be Upcast? ›

Compared to D&D 3.5E or Pathfinder, where this sort of ability was reserved for Sorcerers and heighten metamagic, 5E allows any caster to upcast their spells, making it a far more universally applicable tactic.

Can non casters use scrolls 5E? ›

Any creature that can understand a written language can read the arcane script on a scroll and attempt to activate it. This implies that anyone can try to cast a spell using a scroll.

Can a wizard copy spell scrolls? ›

A wizard spell on a spell scroll can be copied just as spells in spellbooks can be copied. When a spell is copied from a spell scroll, the copier must succeed on an Intelligence (Arcana) check with a DC equal to 10 + the spell's level. If the check succeeds, the spell is successfully copied.

Can you cast 2 concentration spells? ›

You lose Concentration on a spell if you cast another spell that requires Concentration. You can't concentrate on two Spells at once.

Do spell scrolls require verbal? ›

Can you subtle spell cast a spell from a scroll? The scroll only needs to be read so no need for verbal nor somatic is already.

Can you invoke duplicity and concentrate on a spell? ›

@JeremyECrawford Invoke Duplicity: Does it take your spell concentration slot? Or is it like a spell, but doesn't count as casting one? @Aseahawkfan If a feature says it requires concentration, as Invoke Duplicity does, you can't concentrate on it and a spell simultaneously.

Can you use scrolls as a reaction? ›

If the scroll is already in your hand....sure, you can cast it as a reaction. Unless an object is stored in a bag of holding, grabbing it from a bag or pouch is either considered part of the action of using it (such as with ammunition) or a free object interaction (as with weapons).

Can non casters use spell scrolls? ›

The general rule is that anyone who can read a language can read the scroll and attempt to activate it. This makes it so anyone can use types of scrolls that aren't spell scrolls, such as scroll of protection.

Is LOTR based on D&D? ›

It's clear that Dungeons & Dragons was inspired by The Lord of the Rings books, but the similarities between the two properties were a problem for the Tolkien Estate, leading to legal action that caused the tabletop game to be changed forever.

What happens if your twin dies in flicker? ›

If a Twin is killed or voted off, the other Twin will also be killed. If a Twin is healed by a Medic, the other Twin will be healed too.

Can I revive myself in flicker? ›

Unfortunately, you can't revive yourself, since you have to be alive to revive someone. The most common evil role for an inexperienced Savior to revive is the Dark Psychic; those who are more experienced with the role often masquerade as the good Psychic, trying to waste the Savior's revival.

Can you heal yourself in flicker? ›

Once per game, the Medic can self-heal, protecting themself from attacks for the rest of the night.

Can an Eldritch Knight use scrolls? ›

Bottom line: yes, they can attempt to use the scroll. A spell scroll bears the words of a single spell, written in a mystical cipher. If the spell is on your class's spell list, you can read the scroll and cast its spell without providing any material components. Otherwise, the scroll is unintelligible.

Can you bolt bend a Counterspell? ›

You can't target a spell with itself, you can't change the target of counterspell to counterspell; Bolt Bend has to retarget the counterspell to Bolt Bend.

Can you use fork as a Counterspell? ›

Your opponent casts Counterspell and you gain priority again. You can cast Fork now--it will be last on the stack, so will resolve first. You will copy Lightning Bolt; then the copy is put on the stack and resolves, dealing 3 damage; then the Counterspell resolves, countering the original Lightning Bolt.

Can sorcerers cast from scrolls? ›

Arcane spellcasters (wizards, sorcerers, and bards) can only use scrolls containing arcane spells, and divine spellcasters (clerics, druids, paladins, and rangers) can only use scrolls containing divine spells. (The type of scroll a character creates is also determined by his class.)

Can Cantrips be Upcasted? ›

For a level 1 spell slot, you can upcast a cantrip to change its damage type to Cold, Fire, Lightning or Poison. For a level 2 spell slot, you can upcast a cantrip to change its damage type to Acid, Necrotic, Psychic or Thunder.

Can Druid make scrolls? ›

Only creatures that use a class's spell list and have spell slots or who have the Ritual Caster feat can use Spell Scrolls. In the published official material as of 2018, this includes: PCs with levels in the Bard, Cleric, Druid, Paladin, Ranger, Sorcerer, Warlock or Wizard classes.

Can a Wizard add Cantrips from scrolls? ›

No, the number of cantrips known by a wizard is fixed, accordingly to the Wizard table.

Can Arcanists scribe scrolls? ›

Arcanists know a limited number of spells, but can scribe additional spells into their spellbook using scrolls.

Do Rangers count as spell casters? ›

As rangers are not a spellcasting class, their spellcasting ability is derived directly from their wisdom ability score rather than a spellcasting ability score as it is with wizards, sorcerers, and the like.

Can Detect Magic See scrolls? ›

So: Yes, using this spell enables you to sense spell scrolls in the vicinity.

Does copying a spell scroll destroy it 5e? ›

When a spell is copied from a spell scroll, the copier must succeed on an Intelligence (Arcana) check with a DC equal to 10 + the spell's level. If the check succeeds, the spell is successfully copied. Whether the check succeeds or fails, the spell scroll is destroyed.

Can you copy split second spells? ›

Can You Copy a Spell with Split Second? You can't cast a spell that copies another spell while something with split second is on the stack, but there are other ways around it. Triggered abilities that copy spells like The Mirari Conjecture, Mirari, and Bonus Round still trigger and copy those spells.

How long does it take to make a 7th level spell scroll? ›

The cost to scribe a spell scroll is in gold required and time taken. See chart below, all Cantrips scribed are cast as if the caster were 1st level.
...
4 Answers.
LevelTime CostGold Cost
5th4 weeks5,000 gp
6th8 weeks15,000 gp
7th16 weeks25,000 gp
8th32 weeks50,000 gp
6 more rows
7 Apr 2016

How much does it cost to make a scroll 5e? ›

In 5e, a 4th-level scroll takes two weeks and costs 2,500 gold to create. Then if you want to sell that 4th-level scroll, the base price is 2,000 gold. (5th edition numbers are from Xanathar's Guide to Everything, chapter 2).

Can you make a spell scroll 5e? ›

Spellcasters can create their own spell scrolls at a cost. Crafting a D&D 5e spell scroll requires material components and anything else the spell requires. Activating a spell scroll does not require the material components. Skipping material components is one reason spell scrolls make excellent loot.

How long does it take to prepare a spell 5e druid? ›

Preparing a new list of druid Spells requires time spent in prayer and meditation: at least 1 minute per Spell Level for each spell on your list. Wisdom is your Spellcasting ability for your druid Spells, since your magic draws upon your devotion and Attunement to Nature.

Can an Eldritch Knight use scrolls? ›

Bottom line: yes, they can attempt to use the scroll. A spell scroll bears the words of a single spell, written in a mystical cipher. If the spell is on your class's spell list, you can read the scroll and cast its spell without providing any material components. Otherwise, the scroll is unintelligible.

How many rounds does a 1 minute spell last? ›

1 minute is 10 rounds.

Can non casters use scrolls 5e? ›

Any creature that can understand a written language can read the arcane script on a scroll and attempt to activate it. This implies that anyone can try to cast a spell using a scroll.

Can you learn Cantrips from scrolls? ›

Can't you learn them from scrolls if they're for the right class? Nope. The feature of adding spells from scrolls and tomes you come across is specifically limited to spells of 1st level or higher.

How much is a D&D gold piece worth in dollars? ›

Using the standard D&D weight of 50GP to a pound, we find that each GP would be worth about $285, assuming that the gold is commodity quality.

Are spell scrolls expensive? ›

A 1st-level spell scroll is 25 gp, they then say that a 2nd-level spell scroll is 10x more valuable than that as it costs 10x as much gp.

Does copying a spell scroll destroy it 5e? ›

When a spell is copied from a spell scroll, the copier must succeed on an Intelligence (Arcana) check with a DC equal to 10 + the spell's level. If the check succeeds, the spell is successfully copied. Whether the check succeeds or fails, the spell scroll is destroyed.

Can a non caster use a spell scroll? ›

The general rule is that anyone who can read a language can read the scroll and attempt to activate it. This makes it so anyone can use types of scrolls that aren't spell scrolls, such as scroll of protection.

Do spell scrolls require verbal? ›

Can you subtle spell cast a spell from a scroll? The scroll only needs to be read so no need for verbal nor somatic is already.

Can you Wildshape into a dragon? ›

Also at 2nd level, you can use your Wild Shape to transform into a dragon with a challenge rating as high as 1, when you do so you do not have to abide by the other limitations there. Starting at 6th level, you can transform into a dragon with a challenge rating as high as your druid level divided by 3, rounded down.

Can a druid turn into an Owlbear? ›

“But wait,” rules lawyers insist, “a druid can't turn into an owlbear!” Technically, they're right. By the book, druids turn into beasts. And the owlbear is a monstrosity.

Which class has the most spell slots 5e? ›

Classes that access spell slots at Level 1 are full casters. These classes are bard, cleric, druid, sorcerer, and wizard. They gain the most spell slots and can access up to 9th level spell slots: the most powerful spells in the game.

Videos

1. What Druid Guides Aren't Telling You: 5e D&D Druid Guide - Levels 6 - 15
(Enter the Dungeon)
2. NEW Simple Magic Item Rarity System for D&D 5e
(The Dungeon Coach)
3. Pathfinder Scroll Guide
(D6Damage)
4. Crafting Magic Items with D&D 5e Xanathar's Guide to Everything
(Flutes Loot)
5. DM Props - Complete Guide for Dungeons and Dragons 5e
(SkullSplitter Dice)
6. Crafting Magic Items for D&D 5E
(How to D&D)

Top Articles

You might also like

Latest Posts

Article information

Author: Melvina Ondricka

Last Updated: 11/20/2022

Views: 6317

Rating: 4.8 / 5 (48 voted)

Reviews: 95% of readers found this page helpful

Author information

Name: Melvina Ondricka

Birthday: 2000-12-23

Address: Suite 382 139 Shaniqua Locks, Paulaborough, UT 90498

Phone: +636383657021

Job: Dynamic Government Specialist

Hobby: Kite flying, Watching movies, Knitting, Model building, Reading, Wood carving, Paintball

Introduction: My name is Melvina Ondricka, I am a helpful, fancy, friendly, innocent, outstanding, courageous, thoughtful person who loves writing and wants to share my knowledge and understanding with you.