Traditional culture | JAPAN Educational Travel (2022)

Wonders of Traditional Culture in Japan

Japan is a nation consisting of more than six thousand islands. This staggering number of islands along with its temperate climate and distinct four seasons, combine to make a country many varied and interesting local cultures.

Even though Japan, much like other neighboring East Asian countries, has been influenced by China and Chinese culture since the classical times, ever since the United States ended Japan’s long period of relative isolation in the 19th century, Japan has opened up to and embraced Western cultures from regions such as Europe and North America. While learning from other countries, Japan also successfully retains its own unique and beautiful culture.

Nowadays, Japan is a place where anything can happen. Skyscrapers and small shrines stand side-by-side. Eye-popping modernity and long-standing traditions harmoniously coexist. It is an experience you cannot find anywhere else in the world.

infoLearn the History and Culture

History plays an important part in Japanese culture. Many castles and streets are still preserved the way they were built. Having a polytheistic culture, there are also a lot of shrines and temples all around Japan.

Influences from Buddhism and the traditional Shinto religion can be seen in these traditional architectures. Some of these castles and temples are listed as UNESCO World Heritage Sites. Visit these fascinating historical sites and various museums across the country to have a first-hand experience of the history and the culture of Japan.

Traditional culture | JAPAN Educational Travel (1)

Kyoto Sannen-zaka

Traditional culture | JAPAN Educational Travel (2)

Himeji castle

infoEnjoy Festivities in Japan

With a temperate climate, Japan has four lovely and distinct seasons. These seasons together with regional differences across the archipelago have given birth to various local cultures, customs, as well as “matsuri,” or festivals, in Japan. Deriving from the country’s unique Shinto religion, these festivals are closely related to Japanese people’s religious beliefs as well as customs developed in Japan’s agrarian past.

Festivals, apart from a few exceptions, are usually clustered around traditional holidays. Most began in order to celebrate, or to pray for, good harvests. They often feature grand processions as well as local festival markets. As the festive atmosphere fills the air, people’s enthusiasm and excitment soars. Be sure enjoy at least one matsuri if you have the chance!

Traditional culture | JAPAN Educational Travel (3)

Takayama matsuri festival

Traditional culture | JAPAN Educational Travel (4)

Nebuta

infoExperience "Shokunin" Spirit

The Japanese word “Shokunin” can be translated as “craftsman” or “artisan”. But “Shokunin” is much more than that. Beyond just meaning good skills or a piece of beautiful craft, it also celebrates the sheer joy of and dedication to making something to the utmost of one’s ability.

To this day, many Japanese people all over the country still dedicate their lives and efforts to protect and pass down various forms of traditional craftsmanship, including gold foil production, glass crafts, bamboo crafts, lacquerware and traditional paper making. Come to Japan to learn from the great masters of arts and crafts, and experience the joyful world of “Shokunin.”

Traditional culture | JAPAN Educational Travel (5)

Chasen tea whisk

Traditional culture | JAPAN Educational Travel (6)

Inami kiborinosato soyukan musuem

Learn about History and Culture

Learn about the history of Japan at the very spots historial events took place! Japan dedicates much effort into preserving historical sites.

To this day, many old castles, temples and streets retain their original forms. Nowadays, many of these historical sites carry more than their historical meaning, and are also popular tourist attractions. For example, dubbed as one of the three great castles of Japan, Himeji Castle also features as the background in many popular historical TV dramas in Japan.

Traditional culture | JAPAN Educational Travel (7)

Yamadera temple (Yamagata)

directions_walkTemples and Shrines

Traditional culture | JAPAN Educational Travel (8)

Kyoto Kiyomizudera temple

The histories of temples and shrines can go back hundreds to even thousands of years. Take a trip to these temples and shrines and learn about how culture and aesthetics are deeply rooted in the daily life of every Japanese people.

Used to be imperial capitals of Japan in different historical periods, Kyoto and Nara are both ancient cities with rich history and culture. With many temples and shrines with historical meaning well-preserved, Kyoto and Nara are both listed as Historic Monuments in the list of UNESCO World Heritage Sites. For example, the Buddhist temple Byodoin in Kyoto is part of the design of Japanese 10 yen coin, and the phoenix of the Hall of Phoenix in Byodoin is also printed on every 10,000 yen note in Japan.

Kimono, yutaka, and hakama are all fascinating traditional Japanese clothing. Kimono experiences can be found at many places in Kyoto and Nara. If you happen to be in these cities, why not try on some of these exquisite and beautiful traditional clothing and take a stroll at the local temples?

Tourist Spot

place

Temples in Kyotoexpand_more

Kyoto offers you to step back in time as you explore historic temples and shrines in the ancient city. You can explore Japan's rich history and cultural traditions in the heart of Kyoto.

KYOTO CITY OFFICIAL TRAVEL GUIDE open_in_new

Traditional culture | JAPAN Educational Travel (9)

Kyoto Sannen-zaka

place

Temples in Naraexpand_more

Beautiful Buddhist temples, spectacular Shinto shrines and the excavated site of the great Imperial Palace make Nara the ultimate historical spot which is Japan's first permanent capital.

The Official Nara Travel Guide open_in_new

Traditional culture | JAPAN Educational Travel (10)

Nara Hasedera temple

(Video) HELLO JAPAN! - An Educational Tour of Japan

directions_walkJapan's Castles

Traditional culture | JAPAN Educational Travel (11)

Himeji castle

Most of Japan's castles were originally conceived as fortress for military defense. They were often placed in strategic locations, but as towns and cities developed, some were built as centers of governance. As Japan used to consist of many states, there were at one point five thousand castles scattered throughout the country. Today, there are more than one hundred castles still extant in Japan. Some of the most famous castles include the Himeji Castle in Himeji city, the Kumamoto Castle in Kumamoto, and the Matsumoto Castle in Nagano.

Generally well-preserved, most of the Japanese castles are open to the public for tours and exploration. Mostly managed by local governments, these castles often offer guided tours to tourists, and/or reenactments of historical scenes. At some of the castles, you might even have a chance to dress up as princesses, lords, warriors or ninjas!

Tourist Spot

place

Himeji Castleexpand_more

Himeji Castle is also known as the White Heron Castle and is both a Japanese National Treasure and a World Heritage site. Its status as one of Japan's 12 remaining original castles makes this fortress a must for anyone interested the history of Japan.

Himeji Castle open_in_new

Traditional culture | JAPAN Educational Travel (12)

Himeji castle

place

Nagoya Castleexpand_more

Symbol of Nagoya and military might, with samurai on the grounds and crowned with golden dolphins. Though destroyed by World War II air raids, this reconstruction of the 17th-century castle serves as a dramatic reminder of the importance of Nagoya throughout Japanese history and is the city's main tourist destination.

Nagoya Castle open_in_new

Traditional culture | JAPAN Educational Travel (13)

Nagoya castle

place

Kumamoto Castleexpand_more

The castle where Japan crushed its last great rebellion also boasts a daimyo's palace. Despite the damage it suffered in the 2016 earthquakes, Kumamoto Castle remains the top tourist attraction in the city and welcomes nearly two million visitors every year. With its imposing black exterior and sloping ramparts, the castle was particularly difficult to break into and was designed specifically to discourage ninjas from attacking.

Kumamoto Castle open_in_new

Traditional culture | JAPAN Educational Travel (14)

Kumamoto Catsle

place

Matsumoto Castleexpand_more

A moated castle as dark as a crow, with a wooden keep that's the oldest in Japan. Matsumoto is home to one of Nagano's most striking and historic sites, the famous Matsumoto Castle. This medieval fortress, a National Treasure, is one of Japan's premier historic castles and should not be missed if you're passing through the Nagano area .

Matsumoto Castle open_in_new

Traditional culture | JAPAN Educational Travel (15)

Matsumoto castle

directions_walkTravel Back in Time at Japanese Castles

Traditional culture | JAPAN Educational Travel (16)

Nagoya castle

Generally well-preserved, most of the Japanese castles are open to the public for tours and exploration. Mostly managed by local governments, these castles often offer guided tours to tourists, and/or reenactments of historical scenes. At some of the castles, you might even have a chance to dress up as princesses, lords, warriors or ninjas!

(Video) Japan culture and educational tour

directions_walkVisiting Museum

Want to learn more about Japanese history, culture, and arts? Then Museum is just the place for you!

Tourist Spot

place

Edo Tokyo Museumexpand_more

Set foot in the Edo-Tokyo Museum to travel back in time! Established in 1993, the museum's permanent exhibits include a life-size replica of the first wooden Nihonbashi (Japan Bridge) as well as scale models of buildings from the Edo, Meiji and Showa periods. To get a real feel of the history, you may even interact with some of the models here!

Kimono, traditional Japanese outfits, are now mostly only worn for formal occasions, but some Japanese still wear them in their daily lives. Edo-Tokyo Museum offers a free-of-charge kimono experience. Put on an exquisite traditional Japanese garment and take a stroll along the streets of Edo period!

Edo Tokyo Museum open_in_new

place

Tokyo National Museumexpand_more

Established in 1872, Tokyo National Museum is the first museum established in Japan. This museum of arts and culture prides itself on its comprehensive collection of artworks and antiquities from Japan as well as other Asian countries, including numerous paintings and works of calligraphy as well as samurai swords from ancient Japan. Tokyo National Museum offers an array of activities, workshops, symposiums and concerts. There are even interactive stamp collecting activities for children. In short, there is something for everyone.

Tokyo National Museum open_in_new

Traditional culture | JAPAN Educational Travel (17)

Tokyo National Museumexpand_more

Matsuri

Deeply rooted in Japan's unique Shinto religion and traditional agrarian lifestyle, Japan is a country with a vibrant “matsuri” culture. Matsuri is the Japanese word for festival. Festivals often center around traditional holiday, for example Setsubun (the spring equinox marking the change from winter to spring) and Obon (or Bon Festival, a Japanese Buddhist custom to honor the spirits of ancestors).

Also almost every region and town has at least one matsuri in late summer or early autumn to celebrate, or to pray for, a good harvest. These festivals often feature grand processions, festival markets and other local celebration activities. Some of the most famous festivals include the Nebuta festivals of Aomori, and the Eisa Festival in Okinawa. Want to get the fullest and the most authentic Japanese experience? Then you mustn’t miss Japan's matsuri!

Traditional culture | JAPAN Educational Travel (18)

Hakata Gion Yamakasa Festival in Fukuoka

directions_walkTohoku Summer Festival

Traditional culture | JAPAN Educational Travel (19)

Nebuta

Tohoku in Japan's north is home to three of the nation’s most colorful summer celebrations, which are held around the same time.

Tourist Spot

place

Aomori Nebuta Festivals (Nebuta Museum WA-RASSE)expand_more

Nebuta and Neputa festivals in Aomori are some of the most marvelous and popular festivals in Japan. Accompanied by live music and energetic shouts, the enormous brightly colored lanterns float through the sky and are paraded down the streets. Living through long harsh winters, the people of Aomori enjoy celebrating their short summers with such majestic festivals.

Join the Nebuta festival, held every year from August 2nd to 7th, to watch the stunning parades and beautiful fireworks. Don’t worry if you can’t make it to the main event. The city museum also has permanent exhibition of Nebuta all year round.

Nebuta Museum WA-RASSE open_in_new

Traditional culture | JAPAN Educational Travel (20)

Nebuta

place

Yamagata Hanagasa Festivalexpand_more

The Yamagata Hanagasa Festival takes place August 5 to 7 and celebrates the traditional music and dance of the region in one of Tohoku's largest parades. Moving to the hypnotic rhythm of taiko drums, some 10,000 local dancers in dazzling costumes follow gorgeously decorated floats.

Yamagata Hanagasa Festival open_in_new

Traditional culture | JAPAN Educational Travel (21)

Yamagata Hanagasa festival

(Video) Japan Culture educational unit supplement

place

Sendai Tanabata Festivalexpand_more

The biggest Tanabata festival is held in early August in Sendai, Miyagi. People walk down the shopping arcades filled with huge, vividly colored handmade streamers in their finest summer kimono.

Sendai Tanabata Festival open_in_new

Traditional culture | JAPAN Educational Travel (22)

Sendai Tanabata Festival

directions_walkAwa Dance

Traditional culture | JAPAN Educational Travel (23)

Awaodori dance festival

Believed to originate from a Japanese Buddhist priestly dance and a traditional harvest dance that said to be last for several days, Awa dance is also nicknamed Ahou dance, or “fool’s dance” in Japanese. The lively and sometimes even frenzied dance style is traditional to the Tokushima Prefecture. It is typically accompanied by traditional Japanese instruments including shamisen lute, taiko drums, shinbone flute and the kane bell.

Each year from 12 to 15 August, a city-wide Awa Dance Festival is held and everyone in the city is welcomed to join in the joyful dance parade. Visit the Awa dance center to see performances and learn about the history behind the dance. You can also learn the dance from the performers, even join them on stage! Come and enjoy the lively and cheerful dance!

Tourist Spot

place

Awa odori hollexpand_more

The Awa Odori Kaikan is the perfect place to learn about and try one of Japan's most famous traditional dances. The dance, performed around Obon (mainly mid-August) when the spirits of dead ancestors are honored, goes back about 400 years.

Awaodori Kaikan open_in_new

directions_walkAll Okinawa Eisa Festival

Being the southeasternmost island of Japan, Okinawa celebrates a quite different yet no less vibrant local culture from the mainland. Eisa, a form of local dance, is one of the most prominent elements of such local culture. On the first weekend after Obon every year, the All Okinawa Eisa Festival is held across the island. The tradition began in 1956 and is now the largest Eisa event in Okinawa. During the three-day festival, people dance Eisa dances in parades to lively music. Each group showcases their own unique style of Eisa.

Hear the lively rhythms of taiko drums as you watch the Eisa dancing at the annual Eisa Dance Parade. The Orion Beer Festival is also held close by so you may watch the wonderful performances while enjoying the local beer.

Okinawa Zento Eisa Matsuri open_in_new

Tourist Spot

place

Eisa Museumexpand_more

Eisa is Okinawa's traditional dance, which is peformed during Bon festival (Japanese Buddhist event for celebrating ancestors). You can learn and experience Eisa in Eisa Museum.

Eisa Museum open_in_new

Experience "Shokunin" Spirit

One of the most famous things about Japanese culture, is its “Shokunin” spirit. Shokunin spirit means much more than just “craftsman” or “artisan,” it also evokes a celebration of the sheer joy and dedication involved in making something to the best of one’s ability. To this day, many Japanese people still dedicate their lives in preserving and passing down the traditional skills such as gold foil making in Kanazawa, bamboo crafts in Shizuoka, and traditional Japanese lacquerware, or “Japan,” making in Wajima. Other famous crafts also include Arita porcelain wares in Saga, brushes in Kumano, iron wares in Iwate, and much more.

What’s more, most of these traditional craftsmen also provide hands-on experience to anyone who’s interested. You may sign up for these activities at towns around the country to make your own souvenir.

Traditional culture | JAPAN Educational Travel (24)

Imariyaki ware

(Video) 20 Dance Styles From Around The World

directions_walkExperience Traditional Japanese Crafts Firsthand

Traditional culture | JAPAN Educational Travel (25)

Yuzen-zome embroidery

The “shokunin” spirit in Japanese culture give rise to many magnificent and exquisite traditional crafts. Thanks to the people dedicated to preserving traditional craftsmanship, today, we are able to admire these amazing arts and skills in Japan.

There are many different local crafts communities in cities and townships all around Japan. You may even try out some DIY experiences at local crafts communities. Many such local crafts and art centers also offer DIY activities for tourists. For example, you may try out Kaga embroidery in Ishikawa, or make your own bamboo souvenir in Shizuoka.

Tourist Spot

place

Kanazawa (Kaga embroidery)expand_more

Kaga-Yuzen is one of Japanese traditional dyeing technique, Yuzen dyeing, which became popular around 17th century. Artistic pattern and the gradation are charactrized as this technique.

Kaga-Yuzen (Kaga embroidery) Kimono Center open_in_new

Traditional culture | JAPAN Educational Travel (26)

Kaga Yuzen embroidery

place

Tokyo (Edo kiriko)expand_more

The history of traditional glass art Edo kiriko back into the end of Edo period (around 17th century). It is curved various patterns on the surface of tha grass gracefully.

GO TOKYO open_in_new

place

Hiroshima (Kumano brushes)expand_more

Kumano brushes are made in Kumano-cho in Hiroshima. Various types of brushes are produced with high skill, such as paintbrush and cosmetic brush.

Visit Hiroshima open_in_new

Temples in Kyoto Temples in Nara Himeji Castle Nagoya Castle Kumamoto Castle Matsumoto Castle Edo Tokyo Museum Tokyo National Museum Aomori Nebuta Festivals (Nebuta Museum WA-RASSE) Yamagata Hanagasa Festival Sendai Tanabata Festival Awa odori holl Eisa Museum

directions_walk Temples and Shrines

directions_walk Japan's Castles

directions_walk Travel Back in Time at Japanese Castles

directions_walk Visiting Museum

directions_walk Tohoku Summer Festival

directions_walk Awa Dance

directions_walk All Okinawa Eisa Festival

directions_walk Experience Traditional Japanese Crafts Firsthand

Recommended Model Itineraries

Introducing recommended model itineraries to learn Traditional culture

Participate in the lives of Japanese people by staying in a farmhouse and experiencing agriculture Wakayama - Kyoto - Osaka 5-nights trip Traditional culture Natural environment Japanese food Social systems and infrastructure arrow_rightView more details
Traditional culture | JAPAN Educational Travel (27)
Learn about the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake and Tsunami, and experience traditional customs and festivals Akita - Iwate - Aomori 5-nights trip Traditional culture Natural environment Japanese food Crisis management arrow_rightView more details
Traditional culture | JAPAN Educational Travel (28)
Follow the renowned “Golden Route” in Japan. Tokyo - Kanagawa - Aichi - Kyoto - Osaka 6-nights trip Traditional culture Modern culture Made in Japan Social systems and infrastructure arrow_rightView more details
Traditional culture | JAPAN Educational Travel (29)
A peace study tour to Nagasaki and Hiroshima: Contemplating peace Fukuoka - Oita - Nagasaki - Hiroshima 5-nights trip Traditional culture Natural environment Crisis management Peace and friendship arrow_rightView more details
Traditional culture | JAPAN Educational Travel (30)

Recommended Stories for Educational Programs

Introducing educational programs for the theme of Traditional culture

arrow_rightSee stories for Traditional culture

(Video) African Wedding | African Culture For Kids - Educational Videos for Children

FAQs

What is a traditional culture in Japan? ›

Having a polytheistic culture, there are also a lot of shrines and temples all around Japan. Influences from Buddhism and the traditional Shinto religion can be seen in these traditional architectures. Some of these castles and temples are listed as UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

What are the Japanese values and traditions? ›

In Japan, some of the core values are thinking of others, doing your best, not giving up, respecting your elders, knowing your role, and working in a group. These concepts are taught explicitly and implicitly from nursery school into the working world.

How did the Japanese develop their culture? ›

Early Japanese culture was heavily influenced by China. During the Edo era, Japan exercised a strict isolationist policy, closing its doors to all relationships with the outside world. This cultivated a distinct Japanese culture.

What traditional culture means? ›

1. A set of information, practices and experiences transmitted through traditional means transmitted from generation to generation in a society.

What is the most important tradition in Japan? ›

The three most important celebrations in Japan are: 1) The new year's day. Japanese people visit a shrine after the midnight on Dec 31 to make a wish. 2) Cherry blossom celebrations in April. It is a custom to have a picnic under the cherry trees.

What makes Japanese culture interesting? ›

Japan's architecture, art, traditions, crafts. Also, its worldwide known pop culture (including manga, anime, and video games). It's something that definitely only Japan can offer. No other country contains the same characteristics.

Why is it important to learn about Japanese culture? ›

In addition, when you learn Japanese, you become not only proficient in the language but also gain an insider view of the culture. Understanding the Japanese work ethic, their business etiquette, and knowing which cultural faux pas to avoid can often make or break an important business deal.

How is education system in Japan? ›

In Japan, higher education starts upon the completion of 12 years of education: elementary education (6 years of elementary school) and secondary education (3 years of lower secondary school and 3 years of upper secondary school).

What are the examples of culture in Japan? ›

Japan cultural features
  • Shinto and Buddhism in Japan. ...
  • Cherry blossom season in Japan. ...
  • The Meiji Period. ...
  • Shrines and Temples. ...
  • Japanese cuisine. ...
  • Sumo wrestling. ...
  • Onsen: Japanese hot springs. ...
  • Ryokan: traditional inns.

What are 3 main cultural values in Japan? ›

Harmony, order, and self-development are three of the most important values that underlie Japanese social interaction. Basic ideas about self and the nature of human society are drawn from several religious and philosophical traditions.

What is your reason why you like Japanese culture? ›

Japanese traditional culture is very special and original, and it's to present the beauty of the country. Also, Japan has developed different culture of futuristic and modern which is totally different from the former. Japan is the great example where historical/traditional and high-tech/modern can coexist.

Why is tradition important? ›

Traditions bring a sense of security. We come to rely on certain rituals and events that unify us and bring back memories of the past. The players of the event may change, but the tradition remains the same and keeps us connected to the past, in addition to building memories of the present.

Which country has the best traditional culture? ›

  • Spain. #1 in Heritage. #19 in Best Countries Overall. ...
  • Italy. #2 in Heritage. #16 in Best Countries Overall. ...
  • Greece. #3 in Heritage. #27 in Best Countries Overall. ...
  • France. #4 in Heritage. #11 in Best Countries Overall. ...
  • Mexico. #5 in Heritage. ...
  • India. #6 in Heritage. ...
  • Thailand. #7 in Heritage. ...
  • Egypt. #8 in Heritage.

What are traditional cultural values? ›

Traditional values are traditions that have been acknowledged, assessed, rigorously appraised by time, it is chosen and recognized by the community through historical periods. However, such an ap- praisal is not a subjective opinion but must be based on an objective evaluation.

What is the best meaning of tradition? ›

1 : the handing down of information, beliefs, or customs from one generation to another. 2 : a belief or custom handed down from one generation to another.

What is meant by culture in education? ›

The term school culture generally refers to the beliefs, perceptions, relationships, attitudes, and written and unwritten rules that shape and influence every aspect of how a school functions, but the term also encompasses more concrete issues such as the physical and emotional safety of students, the orderliness of ...

What is traditional and examples? ›

The definition of traditional is something that is in keeping with long-standing tradition, style or custom. An example of traditional is the practice of eating turkey as the traditional or accepted Thanksgiving meal. An example of traditional is a formal style of furniture that doesn't change with fads or the seasons.

What is an example of a traditional belief? ›

Traditional belief holds that there are both good elves and bad elves, light elves and dark. This example is from Wikipedia and may be reused under a CC BY-SA license. There is traditional belief that some days are lucky ("kichijitsu") or unlucky.

What is the most interesting fact you learned about Japan? ›

Japan consists of 6,852 islands. The islands were originally attached to the eastern coast of Asia, until tectonic activity caused them to split off, creating the Sea of Japan around 15 million years ago. The Japanese language orders words differently than we do in English.

What are three facts about Japanese culture? ›

Things You Didn't Know About Japanese Culture
  • 'Omiyage' are more than souvenirs. ...
  • Christmas is a romantic holiday. ...
  • There are cues for your shoes. ...
  • Japanese women used to blacken their teeth. ...
  • It's rude to eat or drink while walking. ...
  • Baseball is extremely popular. ...
  • Eating horse meat is common. ...
  • Chopstick positions have meaning.
2 Sept 2021

Does Japan have a unique culture? ›

Japan has always had a reputation for its distinctive culture and unique traditions. As an island nation with a long history of isolation, many aspects of the culture developed completely unaffected by outside influences. But there are so many other reasons why Japan is the most unique country in the world.

What can we learn from Japanese education system? ›

Children are taught to respect other people and to be gentle to animals and nature. They also learn how to be generous, compassionate and empathetic. Besides this, pupils are taught qualities like grit, self-control, and justice.

Is tradition important in Japan? ›

Japan is famous for having one of the richest and most interesting cultures in the world. Many of the country's ancient practices and traditions are still intact today, helping to shape Japan's unique lifestyle and global perception.

Why Japan is best for education? ›

Excellent safety, accessibility, and high quality of life standards make Japan a top location for students. Studying abroad in Japan means you will further your studies in a well-rounded education system, experience a unique new culture, and gain a more international perspective! Win-win-win.

Is Japan good for education? ›

Japan's education system is hard to beat — the country ranks first on the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development's Better Life Index for education. Japanese universities are also some of the best in the world.

Does Japan have the best education? ›

Despite spending less on education than many other developed countries, Japan has one of the best education systems in the world.

What are common Japanese traditions? ›

In Japan, people greet by bowing to one another. A bow can range from a small nod of the head to a deep bend at the waist. A deeper, longer bow indicates sincere respect while a small nod is more casual and informal. Additionally, bowing with your palms together at chest level is not customary in Japan.

What is a unique tradition in Japan? ›

Mamemaki bean throwing during Setsubun

Setsubun is a Japanese holiday celebrated on the eve of the day before Spring begins. The Japanese believe that during this period, demons are likely to appear in the world. Parents throughout Japan will then put on an Oni mask and try to scare their kids.

Why should we keep our culture and traditions alive? ›

The importance of preserving heritage, tradition and race

Culture and its heritage reflect and shape values, beliefs, and aspirations, thereby defining a people's national identity. It is important to preserve our cultural heritage, because it keeps our integrity as a people.

Why is it important to keep our tradition alive? ›

For many, living according to traditional ways of life creates a sense of cultural identity, fosters a close connection to nature and provides them with increased control over their own destiny.

What are the examples of culture in Japan? ›

Japan cultural features
  • Shinto and Buddhism in Japan. ...
  • Cherry blossom season in Japan. ...
  • The Meiji Period. ...
  • Shrines and Temples. ...
  • Japanese cuisine. ...
  • Sumo wrestling. ...
  • Onsen: Japanese hot springs. ...
  • Ryokan: traditional inns.

What are 3 main cultural values in Japan? ›

Harmony, order, and self-development are three of the most important values that underlie Japanese social interaction. Basic ideas about self and the nature of human society are drawn from several religious and philosophical traditions.

What is the most popular culture in Japan? ›

Japanese popular culture includes Japanese cinema, cuisine, television programs, anime, manga, video games, music, and doujinshi, all of which retain older artistic and literary traditions; many of their themes and styles of presentation can be traced to traditional art forms.

What makes Japan culture unique? ›

Japan's architecture, art, traditions, crafts. Also, its worldwide known pop culture (including manga, anime, and video games). It's something that definitely only Japan can offer. No other country contains the same characteristics.

What is your reason why you like Japanese culture? ›

Japanese traditional culture is very special and original, and it's to present the beauty of the country. Also, Japan has developed different culture of futuristic and modern which is totally different from the former. Japan is the great example where historical/traditional and high-tech/modern can coexist.

What are some traditional activities in Japan? ›

Tea Ceremony, calligraphy, origami, ikebana & bonsai are just a few of the traditional activities you could include as part of your trip to Japan.

Why is tradition important? ›

Traditions bring a sense of security. We come to rely on certain rituals and events that unify us and bring back memories of the past. The players of the event may change, but the tradition remains the same and keeps us connected to the past, in addition to building memories of the present.

What is the most important aspect of Japanese culture? ›

Perhaps the most unique aspect of Japanese culture is the love of precise physical composition. This aesthetic is evident in all facets of Japanese culture, from manicured gardens to small functional homes, from haiku poetry to beautifully arranged traditional foods.

Is one of the popular traditional of Japan? ›

Tea Ceremony. Now one of the most popular traditional experiences of Japanese culture that foreign visitors would like to try is the tea ceremony.

Is Japan rich in culture and tradition? ›

Japan has a rich cultural heritage and you can discover more about it through a range of cultural experiences. Much of traditional Japanese culture is accessible to all visitors, even those with little to no knowledge of Japanese.

Videos

1. Kids Share Their Cultural Tradition | Show & Tell | Hiho Kids
(HiHo Kids)
2. Fujiwara Japanese Consultant conducted Japan culture and educational tour
(FUJIWARA JAPANESE CONSULTANT)
3. Asia | Destination World
(Nat Geo Kids)
4. A day in the life of a teenage samurai - Constantine N. Vaporis
(TED-Ed)
5. Ancient Rome 101 | National Geographic
(National Geographic)
6. Florence Pugh Eats 11 English Dishes - Mukbang | Vogue
(Vogue)

Top Articles

Latest Posts

Article information

Author: Dong Thiel

Last Updated: 11/14/2022

Views: 6628

Rating: 4.9 / 5 (79 voted)

Reviews: 94% of readers found this page helpful

Author information

Name: Dong Thiel

Birthday: 2001-07-14

Address: 2865 Kasha Unions, West Corrinne, AK 05708-1071

Phone: +3512198379449

Job: Design Planner

Hobby: Graffiti, Foreign language learning, Gambling, Metalworking, Rowing, Sculling, Sewing

Introduction: My name is Dong Thiel, I am a brainy, happy, tasty, lively, splendid, talented, cooperative person who loves writing and wants to share my knowledge and understanding with you.