Homemade Fermented Pickle Recipe | The Prairie Homestead (2022)

Homemade Fermented Pickle Recipe | The Prairie Homestead (1)

I’m out of control, you guys…

Since my foray into homemade sauerkraut earlier this year, I’m now on a kick to ferment everything…

I have to admit, it helps that I’m no longer scared of the whole process, and have learned that fermented foods don’t taste gross– as long as they are done right.

My homemade fermented ketchup boosted my confidence even further, so I hunted down some pickling cucumbers at the Farmer’s Market (the ones in my garden aren’t ready yet…) and have dove head-first into the salty world of old-fashioned brined pickles.

And my oh my, I am so glad I did.

But first, in case you’re wondering about the whole brined pickles vs. fermented pickles vs. vinegar pickles thing, here’s a quick run-down:

Homemade Fermented Pickle Recipe | The Prairie Homestead (2)

(Video) Preserve Your Cucumbers the Old-Fashioned Way | Fermented Pickles

Three Ways to Make Pickles

  • Fermented/Brine Pickles: These are the ones we’re making today. Fermented pickles rely on good old-fashioned salt and beneficial bacteria to make things happen. The best part about a fermented pickle recipe? It’s easy to make as little (or as much) as you need, and they are packed-full of probiotic benefit.
  • Vinegar Refrigerator Pickles: These guys are also simple to make, however, they will be lacking in the probiotic department. Instead of using the fermenting process, refrigerator pickles rely on vinegar for that traditional pickle tang. Learn more about quick pickles and find a great brine recipe in my article here.
  • Traditional Canned Vinegar Pickles: I’ve made a whole lotta canned pickles in my preservation career thus far. The benefits of canned pickles is that you can put up big batches at once and they will be shelf-stable for long periods of time. The downside? The high-temps ruin any beneficial bacteria and a lot of the nutrients. They can also be mushy if you aren’t careful. Check out my 5 Best Tips for Crispy Crunchy Pickles before you can your pickles for some ideas on how to prevent mushy home-canned pickles.

Why Use an Airlock Fermenting System?

Airlocks make the fermenting process even more fool-proof (especially for beginners) by reducing the the chance of mold, and allowing the ferment to release gases without you having to “burp” it. Can you ferment without an airlock? Sure, but to me, an airlock seems like cheap insurance for a better end result.

There are a number of air lock systems out there, but I’ve been lovingthe Fermentools system.It fits right onto mason jars so I don’t have to buy a bunch of special jars, and it makes it easy to makebigbatches (I did several 1/2 gallon jars with this pickle recipe, and it didn’t take any extra work or equipment to make it happen). I’ve been working with Matt from Fermentools for a while now and he’s been totally helpful as I’ve navigated my first adventures into fermenting.

Homemade Fermented Pickle Recipe | The Prairie Homestead (3)

Fermented Pickle Recipe

You will need (per quart jar):

  • Small pickling cucumbers*
  • 1-2 cloves garlic
  • 1 tablespoon mustard seed
  • 10 peppercorns
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1-2 heads of fresh dill (or 1 tablespoon dill seed, if you prefer)
  • Sea salt and water to make 2% brine solution (instructions below)

*It might be tempting to try to use the larger, slicing cucumbers to make pickles, but don’t. They are mostly water and will give you a mushy, limp result. Your local farmer’s market should have loads of pickling cucumbers if you can’t grow them yourself, and you’ll be glad you went to the extra trouble to find them. Here are my best tips for keeping your pickles super crunchy.

How to Make 2% Brine:

Dissolve 1 tablespoon fine sea salt in 4 cups non-chlorinated water. If you don’t use all of the brine for this recipe, it will keep indefinitely in the fridge.

(Video) The Quickest Homemade Pickles Ever | Refrigerator Pickle Recipe

I always use sea salt for my brines, but kosher salt or canning salt will work too. Just avoid iodized salts (learn why in my Cooking with Salt article).

The finer the salt, the less stirring you must to do to dissolve, which is niiiiiiice.

The Fermented Pickle Recipe:

Start with very clean jars.

Add the garlic, mustard seed, peppercorns, bay leaf, and dill to each jar.

Homemade Fermented Pickle Recipe | The Prairie Homestead (4)

Wash your cucumbers thoroughly and discard any that are mushy or soft. Remove the blossom end from each cucumber, and pack them into the jars. I prefer to leave my cucumbers whole, as it seems to give a crunchier end result.

(Video) Making Fermented Cucumber Pickles

Cover the cucumbers completely with the 2% brine solution.

Homemade Fermented Pickle Recipe | The Prairie Homestead (5)

Add a weight to the jar to keep the cukes from floating to the top. (I use the handy glass weights from Fermentools, but you can get creative with whatever you have on hand.)

Add the air lock assembly (or regular lid if that’s what you’re using), and set aside to ferment at room temperature for 5-7 days. Keep in mind, the warmer your kitchen, the faster the fermenting process.

After the initial fermenting process is over, remove the airlock, cover with a regular lid, and store at 32-50 degrees for up to six months. (I’m keeping mine in my fridge.) The pickles will continue to slowly ferment and improve in flavor during the storage process. After about six months, they will start to slowly degrade, but will absolutely still be edible. However, I’m betting they’ll be long-gone before then.

Homemade Fermented Pickle Recipe | The Prairie Homestead (6)

(Video) Make the CRISPEST, CRUNCHIEST Canned Pickles EVER! (Use THIS Method)

Fermented Pickles: What’sNormal?

Your fermented pickles might look a little bit different than the home-canned pickles you’re used to.

Here’s what to expect:

  • Cloudy brine, often getting cloudier as time progresses.
  • Fizziness! Fizzy pickles are totally normal and just a sign things are working as they should.
  • Liquid leaking out of the jar. Again, this is a normal process of fermentation. However, you can sometimes avoid it by making sure you don’t add too much brine to your jars.
  • Lots of bubbles = happy pickles
  • Pleasant sour taste. Fermented pickles have a slightly different tang than vinegar pickles. However, my kiddos are still gobbling them up.

If your ferments ever end up with a disgusting or putrid smell, that’s a good indication to toss them.

Homemade Fermented Pickle Recipe | The Prairie Homestead (7)

Homemade Fermented Pickle Recipe | The Prairie Homestead (8)

Fermented Pickle Notes:

  • Want to keep things super simple? You can ditch everything in this recipe but the cucumbers and brine. Seriously! That’s the best thing about pickles– tailor them to your taste preferences and what spices you have on hand.
  • Want super-crunchy pickles? Follow the tips in this post.
  • My Fermentools airlocks makes it super easy to make larger batches of pickles– especially in my half-gallon jars. However, if you only have a handful of cukes, you can still jar them up to ferment in small batches.
  • Can I use whey in my ferments? Yes, some folks use raw whey in their fermented vegetable recipes to jump-start the fermenting process. However, I haven’t found whey to be necessary, and I like the flavor a simple salt brine brings to a recipe.

More Fermented Food Recipes & Tips:

  • How to Use a Fermenting Crock
  • Fermented Ketchup Recipe
  • Pickled Green Beans Recipe
  • How to Make Sauerkraut
  • How to Make Dairy Kefir
  • How to Make Kombucha

Where to Buy Fermenting Stuff?

I’ve been totally impressed with myFermentoolsequipment. Here’s why:

(Video) How to Ferment Green Beans

  • The airlocks work with the jars I already have.
  • You can easily make big batches of fermented foods with little hassle (no lugging around heavy crocks, either)
  • Their glass weights are super nice to justpop into my mason jars so the food doesn’t float out of the brine and get gross.
  • There’s a super-handy chart on the front of their ultra-fine powdered salt bags to help you figure out exactly how much you need for the perfect brine

Shop the online store at Fermentools HERE.

Homemade Fermented Pickle Recipe | The Prairie Homestead (10)

This post is sponsored by Fermentools, which means they sent me one of their air lock systems so I could try it out. However, like everything I promote here on The Prairie Homestead, I don’t promote it unless I’m actually using it and loving it, which is absolutely the case here.

FAQs

How long do homemade fermented pickles last? ›

Fully fermented pickles may be stored in the original container for about 4 to 6 months, provided they are refrigerated and surface scum and molds are removed regularly. Canning fully fermented pickles is a better way to store them.

Do you need vinegar to ferment pickles? ›

Vinegar—Use 5% acidity (50 grain) bottled vinegar. Do not use homemade vinegar or vinegar of unknown acidity in pickling. Spices—Use fresh, whole spices for best flavor in pickles. Water—When brining pickles, hard water may interfere with the formation of acid and prevent pickles from properly curing.

How long does it take for pickle juice to ferment? ›

Store where the temperature is between 70 and 75 F for about 3 to 4 weeks while fermenting. Temperatures of 55 to 65 F are acceptable, but the fermentation will take 5 to 6 weeks. Avoid temperatures above 80 F, or pickles will become too soft during fermentation.

What is the difference between fermentation and pickling? ›

Pickling vs Fermenting

The difference between pickling and fermenting is the process of how they achieve a sour flavor. Pickled foods are sour because they are soaked in acidic brine, while fermented foods are sour because of a chemical reaction between naturally present sugars and bacteria.

Can you ferment pickles too long? ›

Fermented veggies and pickles should taste sour and pickled; they should taste… good. Most people love these flavors right away. A ferment that has been left too long will always show the signs: it will have a colorful mold and its smell will be cheesy, musty and moldy rather than fresh, sour and funky.

Can you add cucumbers to fermenting pickles? ›

Simply make a saltwater brine, submerge the cucumbers in it with herbs and spices, then let the wonderful world of friendly microbes take over. As they eat the natural sugars in the cucumbers, they'll produce lactic acid, which will make the pickles nice and sour and perfectly preserved for longer-term storage.

Why are my fermented pickles mushy? ›

If the pickles are soft, they are spoiled from the yeast fermentation. Don't use them. Using too weak a salt brine or vinegar solution may cause soft or slippery pickles, as can using moldy garlic or storing the pickles at too warm a temperature. These pickles are spoiled and should be discarded.

Which vinegar is best for fermentation? ›

Apple Cider Vinegar: The favorite vinegar of the health gurus. It is a fermented product with healthy bacteria in it, if not pasteurized. Visually, it is brown, and you can sometimes see “the mother” in it (this is the yeast and bacteria responsible for the fermentation).

Why do you boil vinegar when pickling? ›

The key is knowing that first off, boiling your brine (vinegar mixture) will help all the flavors meld better, and that if you add in your pickling subject while the brine is hot, your pickle will be briefly cooked, and you risk losing some of the crunch.

Do fermented pickles need to be refrigerated? ›

If you have a fresh pickle, then it should be refrigerated. However, if you have fermented pickles, then it does not need to be refrigerated. Pasteurized pickles are cucumbers that have been soaked in brine (water, vinegar, and salt) and then sealed in a pickle jar or container.

Is it OK to drink fermented pickle juice? ›

Drinking pickle juice from fermented pickles contains loads of lactobacillus bacteria-- this "good-guy" good bacteria is a really good source of bacteria to promote a healthy gut. A 1.5-ounce serving (that's a shot glass size) of our pickle juice contains 14 billion colony-forming units of live culture bacteria.

What is the ratio of vinegar to water for pickling? ›

The Basics of Making Refrigerator Pickles

The basic ratio for quick pickles is 1:1 vinegar to water, and includes some combination of salt and sugar. Another ratio that is commonly followed is the 3:2:1 method, using three parts vinegar, two parts water, and 1 part sugar.

Are store bought pickles fermented? ›

Most store-bought, big-brand pickles are not fermented. Instead, these cucumbers are just marinated and stored in a vinegar (and spices) brine. This method of pickling is called fresh-pack. These types of pickles don't offer the same probiotic benefits that fermented pickles offer.

Is apple cider vinegar fermented? ›

Apple cider vinegar is apple juice that has been fermented twice. First, crushed apples are mixed with yeast, sugar or another carbohydrate. After a few weeks, natural bacteria and yeasts ferment the juice, changing the carbohydrates into alcohol.

What is the most popular fermented food? ›

The Bottom Line

Common fermented foods include kimchi, sauerkraut, kefir, tempeh, kombucha, and yogurt. These foods may reduce heart disease risk and aid digestion, immunity, and weight loss. Not to mention, fermented foods add tang and zest to your meals and are an excellent addition to a healthy diet.

How do you tell if fermented pickles are ready? ›

The taste test will tell you if it's ready or if it needs more time. When it's ready it will taste sour. If it's sour enough for you and you like the texture, then it's ready. If it's not sour enough or is too crunchy, then let it ferment longer.

What is the white stuff in my fermentation? ›

Mould and Yeast in Fermentation

If there is a whitish layer on the surface of your fermented vegetables jar, it is probably a biofilm that is called “Kham yeast”. Don't worry, it's safe! Microorganisms can form a delicate and almost odourless white biofilm.

Do fermented pickles taste different? ›

The exact taste of fermented vegetables will vary depending on the ingredients of the ferment, the length of the fermentation and the amount of salt used, but if you already like pickles, sauerkraut or kimchi, chances are you'll like the taste of other fermented veggies too.

Should you slice cucumbers before fermenting? ›

But firmness is key, as you need the slices to maintain their shape through fermentation, so if any are soft, or have loose watery seeds you'll want to add those ones to a salad and only use the super firm ones in your fermentation jar.

Can I cut cucumbers before fermenting? ›

Ferment the Pickles

Cut both ends off of the cucumbers and cut them into spears. Add as many cucumber spears into the jars with the spices as can fit. The more the merrier!

Can you put sugar in fermented pickles? ›

Adding sugar at the beginning of pickling (in the first four-days of primary fermentation) would have the sugar interfering with this natural process. And of course, boiling the sweet-sour brine would also destroy the culture.

How do you keep pickles crisp when fermenting? ›

Soaking your cucumbers in ice water 30-60 minutes before fermenting seems to help keep crispness.

How do you keep your homemade pickles crisp? ›

Soak Cucumbers In Ice Water Beforehand

If you're not canning your cucumbers immediately, leave them in an ice bath or in your refrigerator overnight to maintain firmness. Doing this before you start canning them will give you the crunchiest pickles you've ever had!

Why do you soak cucumbers in ice water before pickling? ›

For a quick and easy way to help ensure crisp pickles: soak cucumbers in ice water for 4 to 5 hours before pickling. This is a safer method for making crisp pickles. Using lime, or calcium hydroxide, in solution for soaking cucumbers changes the amount of acid in the cucumber tissue.

How long do you ferment vinegar? ›

Keep the containers away from direct sunlight and maintain the temperature at 60 to 80 degrees F. Full fermentation will take about 3 to 4 weeks. Near the end of this period, you should notice a vinegar-like smell. Taste samples daily until the desired strength is reached.

Can you over ferment vinegar? ›

If the mother is left in the container for too long it can begin to rot and adversely affect the finished vinegar. After a few weeks of fermentation, it is time to test your vinegar. You will want to check the sugar, alcohol, acetic acid levels, and, of course, the flavor of your product.

How much vinegar do you put in fermentation? ›

To properly guide the fermentation, we recommend seeding the alcohol with a mother of vinegar. The mother of vinegar is a liquid filled with acetic acid bacteria. It is best to use about 20% of mother vinegar to the volume of alcohol. For example, if you have 1L of cider, you should add 200ml of mother of vinegar.

What kind of vinegar is best for pickling? ›

Most pickle recipes call for distilled white vinegar. This is the clear, colorless vinegar made by fermenting grains. It has a mellow aroma, tart acid flavor and does not affect the color of the light-colored vegetables or fruits.

Is sugar necessary for pickling? ›

"Pickles are about vinegar and salt, not sweetness," says Perry. Yes, you should have some sugar, but be wary of recipes that call for more than a ¼ cup of sugar. Your brine should lean salty, not syrupy. If you just use vinegar in your brine, it will be way too sharp, warns Perry.

What is the ratio of salt to water for pickling? ›

Prepare a brine using the ratio of two tablespoons of salt to one quart of water. If it is over 85 degrees in your kitchen, use one extra tablespoon of salt. Stir well and set aside. Chop vegetables into sticks or bite-sized pieces.

How long do you ferment pickles in a crock? ›

Homemade Crock Dill Pickles - Amazing Fermented Pickles

Are fermented pickles good for you? ›

Fermented pickles are full of good bacteria called probiotics, which are important for gut health. Fights diseases. Cucumbers are high in an antioxidant called beta-carotene, which your body turns into vitamin A.

How long do homemade pickles last unopened? ›

Unopened pickles retain quality for about 2 years of pickling (or a year past the date on the label). Once you open the jar, pickles taste best for about 2 to 4 months, possibly more if you're into really sour dill pickles. For pickles that you buy in bulk from a barrel, eat them within a week.

Do pickles help your liver? ›

The health benefits of pickles may include a supply of probiotics, diabetes management, improved digestion, liver protection, and the ability to heal ulcers.

Are pickles good for your kidneys? ›

Pickles and Relish

They are high in sodium and should be avoided on a kidney diet. Pickles and relish are high in sodium and should be avoided on a kidney diet. If you're craving a pickle, opt for low-sodium pickles to limit your daily sodium intake.

Can bacteria grow in pickle juice? ›

Any exposed pickle or brine becomes a breeding ground for the bad microbes, which can spread to spoil the entire batch.

Can you pickle with just vinegar? ›

Brine Basics

Any basic vinegar is game — white vinegar, apple cider, white wine, and rice vinegar all work well. You can use these vinegars alone or in combination. Steer clear of aged or concentrated vinegars like balsamic or malt vinegar for pickling.

Can you use apple cider vinegar instead of white vinegar for pickles? ›

Use apple cider or white distilled vinegar, but the pickles may taste best with the recommended type in the recipe. Apple cider vinegar is milder and offers a different flavor note than white distilled vinegar. Any vinegar should be at least five percent acetic acid. Read every recipe carefully.

How do I make my pickles less sour? ›

If a pickle recipe comes out quite sour for your taste, don't be tempted to dilute the vinegar with water (or more water than called for) the next time you make it. That would reduce the safety. Instead, there's an easy way to fix the taste: just fool the taste buds by adding sweetener to mask some sourness.

What type of pickles are fermented? ›

Sour pickles, also commonly called “real pickles,” are fermented pickles that get their sour flavor from fermentation rather than the addition of vinegar. These products always contain natural bacteria that are beneficial to your gut and immune system.

Does Walmart carry fermented pickles? ›

IN A PICKLE

Kruegermann Naturally Fermented Pickles, $6.95 at Walmart. For once, it's good to find yourself in a pickle. But only if it's a naturally fermented pickle - not a pickle that's been brined in vinegar. Naturally fermented pickles contain lactobacillus, a good bacteria that promotes healthy digestion.

Are all Mt Olive pickles fermented? ›

We never rush the fermentation process, we let our pickling cucumbers bathe as long as they need to in our delicious salt brine until they are perfectly fermented. Every jar of Genuine Dills from Mt. Olive is packed with the flavor that delivers.
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What happens if you drink apple cider vinegar every morning? ›

There's some evidence that supports the fact that apple cider vinegar, had first thing in the morning may promote faster weight loss and accelerate fat burning. Since it works primarily as a detoxifying agent, a shot of apple cider vinegar in the morning can clear out toxins from the body and aid a fresh start.

What happens to your body when you drink apple cider vinegar everyday? ›

According to a study published in Bioscience, Biotechnology, & Biochemistry, consuming apple cider vinegar each day can lead to weight loss, reduced belly fat, smaller waist circumference, and lower blood triglycerides.

What medications does apple cider vinegar interfere with? ›

Some medications, including insulin, digoxin, and certain diuretics, may interact with apple cider vinegar.
...
A few medications may interact with apple cider vinegar:
  • Diabetes medication. ...
  • Digoxin (Lanoxin). ...
  • Certain diuretic drugs.

What is the difference between pickled and fermented? ›

The difference between pickling and fermenting is the process of how they achieve a sour flavor. Pickled foods are sour because they are soaked in acidic brine, while fermented foods are sour because of a chemical reaction between naturally present sugars and bacteria.

What is the easiest fermented food to eat? ›

Yogurt is widely available, and other fermented foods like kefir, sauerkraut and kimchi are becoming easier to find.

Can homemade pickles go bad? ›

Once you've opened a jar of pickles — homemade or store-bought — they'll last for up to two years in the refrigerator. To ensure they stay fresh and don't go bad, seal the jar completely after each use, and keep your fridge temperature set to between 34°F and 40°F.

Do fermented foods expire? ›

Fermented foods that are properly prepared and stored in a cool, dark place (like the refrigerator) can last at least 4-18 months. Always look for any signs of mold, an even color throughout, and make sure it still looks edible.

How do you preserve homemade pickles? ›

Wash, dry, label, and store sealed jars in a clean, cool, dark place. If lid is unsealed, examine and replace jar if defective, use new lid, and reprocess as before. Wash screw bands and store separately. Pickles are best if used within a year and are safe as long as the lids remain vacuum sealed.

Can you keep pickle brine for years? ›

I'm here to say, yes! You can absolutely reuse that brine as long as… You're only using it to make refrigerator pickles. Once a brine has been used to can something, that's it.

What is the white stuff in my pickle jar? ›

A cloudy appearance or a white sediment may indicate the use of table salt rather than canning or pickling salt. Yeast develops and settles to the bottom of the jar. It may be a normal reaction during fermentation caused by bacteria. If the pickles are soft, they are spoiled from the yeast fermentation.

Why does my pickle taste bitter? ›

Bitter cucumbers contain elevated amounts of a compound called cucurbitacin, which is produced when cucumber plants are stressed and growing conditions less than optimal.

Why are my homemade pickles fizzy? ›

What happens if a jar of Real Pickles is left out of refrigeration? The fermentation process will resume. After a few hours at warm temperatures, some carbonation may develop in the jar, leading to a fizzy or tingling sensation on the tongue.

Can botulism grow in fermented foods? ›

Foodborne botulism. Many cases of foodborne botulism have happened after people ate home-canned, preserved, or fermented foods that were contaminated with toxin. The foods might have become contaminated if they were not canned (processed) correctly.

Why does my sauerkraut smell like bleach? ›

Strong Odors

Even bleach! Yes, the smell is one of the fermentation signs to “look” for. Those are just a few of the terms used to describe what fermenting sauerkraut smells like. The sulfur-containing compounds in cabbage – and other cruciferous vegetables – are what produce these strong and pungent odors.

Do fermented pickles need to be refrigerated? ›

If you have a fresh pickle, then it should be refrigerated. However, if you have fermented pickles, then it does not need to be refrigerated. Pasteurized pickles are cucumbers that have been soaked in brine (water, vinegar, and salt) and then sealed in a pickle jar or container.

Why do you boil vinegar when pickling? ›

The key is knowing that first off, boiling your brine (vinegar mixture) will help all the flavors meld better, and that if you add in your pickling subject while the brine is hot, your pickle will be briefly cooked, and you risk losing some of the crunch.

Why do you soak cucumbers in salt water before pickling? ›

Saltwater Brine: This method, also known as saltwater soaking, is used to pull out excess water from cucumbers before pickling, which will help prevent soggy pickles.

What is the ratio of vinegar to water for pickling? ›

The Basics of Making Refrigerator Pickles

The basic ratio for quick pickles is 1:1 vinegar to water, and includes some combination of salt and sugar. Another ratio that is commonly followed is the 3:2:1 method, using three parts vinegar, two parts water, and 1 part sugar.

How long do homemade pickles last without canning? ›

Homemade pickles should last for two months in the refrigerator in their jar. However, the longer they sit, the less crunchy they become.

Can you cut up cucumbers and put them in pickle juice? ›

Cucumbers in Pickle Juice – This recipe hack couldn't be easier and it's a great way to use up leftover pickle juice too. You prepare fresh cucumbers, and just drop them into the pickle juice, cover, and allow to marinate, and then enjoy!

How many times can you reuse homemade pickle brine? ›

How many times can I reuse pickle juice? To be on the safe side, we wouldn't recommend reusing it more than once, although some say you can safely reuse it 2 or 3 times. Again, watch for changes in the clarity of the brine.

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