Homemade Buttermilk Biscuits Recipe - Gimme Some Oven (2022)

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My favorite homemade buttermilk biscuit recipe — easy to make, perfectly soft and tall and flaky, and always SO buttery and delicious.

Homemade Buttermilk Biscuits Recipe - Gimme Some Oven (1)

A few weeks ago when I happened to pass by our local KFC here in Barcelona, I suddenly found myself majorly craving some crispy chicken fingers and buttermilk biscuits. (Haven’t had either in years since we moved abroad!) I decided to indulge and popped in impulsively to place a quick order. But after scanning the menu again and again and again, I realized that — gasp — biscuits apparently aren’t available at KFC here in Spain!

When I mentioned my shock on Instagram, dozens of you from around the world replied that your international KFCs also do not offer biscuits on the menu. (Which, we’ve all agreed, feels like a majorly missed opportunity, KFC — who in the world wouldn’t love your soft and buttery buttermilk biscuits?!) Either way, though, I realized that day that if I wanted to satisfy my craving for biscuits, I was going to have to make them myself. So I picked up some buttermilk on my way home, pulled up the bookmark of my favorite recipe that I have turned to over the years, and baked up a quick batch from scratch. And wow, I had almost forgotten just how magical a fresh-outta-the-oven hot pan of buttermilk biscuits can be.

(Video) 3-Ingredient Buttermilk Biscuits

Nothing beats a good homemade biscuit. ♡

This particular recipe that I like to use is also incredibly easy to make by hand with basic ingredients that you likely already have in your kitchen, and comes together from start to finish in just over a half hour. And the combination of creamy butter and tangy buttermilk yields here yields the most delicious biscuits, especially when brushed with some extra melted butter hot out of the oven and sprinkled with a pinch of flaky sea salt (which I highly recommend). The simple folding technique used here also helps ensure that your biscuits will bake up soft and tall, and pull apart into flaky layers upon layers when you crack them open.

Bottom line, this recipe has never let me down when the biscuit cravings strike. It’s perfect for morning biscuits and gravy or biscuits with jam, works great as a side dish with dinner, or you can even be used to top your favorite chicken pot pie or other casseroles. It’s simple, classic and never lets me down. So if you are looking for a reliable homemade biscuit recipe to have in your repertoire, definitely bookmark this one and let’s bake a batch together!

Homemade Buttermilk Biscuits Recipe - Gimme Some Oven (2)

Buttermilk Biscuit Ingredients:

Before we get to the full recipe below, here are a few quick notes about the ingredients you will need to make the best homemade biscuits:

  • Flour:When making classic buttermilk biscuits, I opt for standard all-purpose flour and recommend weighing it so that you have the correct amount.
  • Baking powderand baking soda:To help give these biscuits be extra-soft and rise nice and tall.
  • Light brown sugar (optional):I like to add a tiny hint of sweetness to my biscuits (any kind of sugar or honey would work), but you are welcome to leave the sweetener out if you prefer.
  • Salt:I wrote this recipe using fine sea salt in the biscuits, plus an extra optional sprinkle of flaky (or fine) sea salt on top of the biscuits before serving. If you do not have sea salt and are using iodized table salt, I recommend usinghalf of the amount listed in the recipe.
  • Butter:It’s extremely important that the butter be very, very cold for this recipe so that the biscuits can bake up to be tall and flaky. So be sure that it has been completely chilled in the fridge before dicing and adding it to the dough. (Or if you happen to have the time, I recommend popping your butter in the freezer for 30 minutes before using it to make it extra cold.) I also recommend brushing the baked biscuits with a bit of melted
  • Buttermilk: The buttermilk in this recipe also needs to have been completely chilled in the fridge before adding it to the recipe. I used full-fat buttermilk here, which I highly recommend, but low-fat buttermilk or “homemade “buttermilk (made by mixing whole milk and lemon juice) would also work.

I also recommend the following equipment to make this easy biscuit recipe:

  • Pastry cutter:You can either use a pastry cutter or two forks to cut the butter into the dry ingredients by hand. Or alternately, if you happen to own a food processor, you can use that to pulse the butter and dry ingredients.
  • Biscuit cutter:I recommend a 2 to 2.5-inch round biscuit cutter for this recipe, preferably one with a handle so that you do not have to twist the biscuits to cut them out of the dough. That said, if you do not have a biscuit cutter, you can just roll the dough into a 9-inch rectangle and cut the dough into 9 even squares.
  • Rolling pin:Using a rolling pin, versus patting the dough down with your (warm) hands, helps greatly to keep the dough nice and chilled.
  • Pastry brush:If you would like to brush the biscuits with some warm melted butter once they come out of the oven.

Homemade Buttermilk Biscuits Recipe - Gimme Some Oven (3)

7 Important Tips For How To Make The Best Biscuits:

Detailed instructions are included in the recipe below for how to make biscuits. But first, please take a moment to read the following tips so that your biscuits are sure to be perfectly soft, flaky, tall, and EPIC. ♡

  1. Keep your ingredients cold, cold, cold:In order for the butter to stay extra-cold and not melt while forming these biscuits — which will help them to rise in the oven to flaky perfection — it’s important that the butter and other ingredients in this recipe stay as cold as possible before baking. So be sure that your butter and buttermilk are completely chilled and stay in the fridge until you add them to the recipe. (Or better yet, pop the butter in the freezer for 30 minutes before adding it to the recipe.) Then try to work quickly once the butter has been added to the recipe, avoid touching the butter with your warm hands as much as possible, and let the formed biscuits chill in the fridge or freezer for 15 minutes before baking so that the butter can firm back up again. It sounds picky, but keeping your butter nice and cold will really make a difference in this recipe!
  2. Aim for pea-sized butter chunks:When cutting (mixing) the butter into the dry ingredients, aim for it to be broken up into pea-sized chunks. You don’t want the butter chunks to be too much smaller. Otherwise, the biscuits will be flatter and less flaky.
  3. Be gentle with the dough:When rolling and folding the dough, try to be fairly gentle with it and do not press the dough down extra-hard with your rolling pin.
  4. Don’t over-flour the dough between folds:Also try to avoid adding unnecessary amounts of flour to the dough while folding and rolling it out. You will, of course, need to sprinkle on a bit of extra flour throughout the process so that the dough doesn’t stick to the surface or the rolling pin. But too much extra flour will cause the layers to separate a bunch, and your flaky biscuit layers may topple over a bit in the oven. (Which isn’t a terrible thing — they will still be delicious!)
  5. Don’t twist the biscuit cutter:When cutting out the biscuits, try to avoid twisting the biscuit cutter. Doing so will “seal” the edges of the biscuits, which will prevent them from separating into flaky layers and rising as tall.
  6. Cut the biscuits into squares (if you don’t have a biscuit cutter): Alternately, if you do not own a round biscuit cutter, you can just roll out the dough into roughly a 9-inch square, and then cut the dough into 9 equally-sized (3-inch) biscuit squares.
  7. Consider your options for crispy or taller biscuits: If you prefer your biscuits to have crispy sides, like I do, space them evenly apart on the baking sheet. Or if you would prefer taller biscuits with softer sides, you can place them side-by-side so that they are touching on the baking sheet (or you could opt to bake them in a cast-iron pan or pie plate instead).

Homemade Buttermilk Biscuits Recipe - Gimme Some Oven (4)

(Video) Homemade Buttermilk Biscuits | Just Like My Mama Made Them | Easy Recipe

More Essential Bread Recipes:

Looking for more classic bread recipes to bookmark for your repertoire? Here are a few of my go-to favorites…

  • 1-Hour Soft Dinner Rolls
  • No Knead Bread
  • Honey Beer Bread
  • Banana Bread
  • Pumpkin Bread

Homemade Buttermilk Biscuits Recipe - Gimme Some Oven (5)

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My favorite homemade buttermilk biscuit recipe — easy to make, perfectly soft and tall and flaky, and always SO buttery and delicious.

  1. Mix the dry ingredients:Combine the flour, baking powder, brown sugar, salt and baking soda in a large mixing bowl. Stir briefly to combine.
  2. Cut in the butter.Sprinkle the diced butter over the dry ingredient mixture. Use a pastry cutter or two forks (or a food processor*) to cut the butter into the dry ingredients until it is well-mixed and forms pea-sized chunks of butter.
  3. Add the buttermilk.Pour in the cold buttermilk and stir until the dough until it isjust combined. (Try to avoid over-mixing the dough.)
  4. Form the dough. Turn the dough out onto a floured work surface. Use your hands to quickly shape the dough into a small rectangle. Use a rolling pin to roll the dough out evenly until it is about 1/2-inch thick.
  5. Fold the dough. Then fold the dough on top of itself into thirds (like you are folding an envelope, see image above). Rotate the dough 90 degrees. Then repeat the folding process a second time, rotate, repeat the folding process a third time, rotate.
  6. Cut the dough.Roll the dough out once more into a roughly 10 x 5-inch rectangle. Then use a 2 to 2.5-inch biscuit cutter to firmly cut the dough into 8 circles, taking care not to twist the biscuit cutter at all when cutting the dough, and arrange the biscuits evenly on the prepared baking sheet.* If you would like, re-roll the remaining dough scraps and cut out 1 or 2 more biscuits.
  7. Heat the oven.Heat the oven to 450°F (232°C). And transfer the biscuits to your freezer or refrigerator for 15 minutes as the oven heats.
  8. Bake.Once the oven is ready to go, bake the biscuits for 10-12 minutes, or until they achieve your desired level of browning on top. Transfer the baking sheet to a wire rack. Then, if you would like, brush the tops of the biscuits with some melted butter and sprinkle with a pinch of flaky sea salt.
  9. Serve.Serve warm and enjoy!
(Video) How To Make Grandma Barb's Southern Buttermilk Biscuits

Notes

Chilling the butter: If you have the extra time, I recommend chilling your butter in the freezer for 30 minutes before adding it to the recipe so that it can be extra cold. (I also recommend chilling the flour too!)

Alternate food processor shortcut:Alternately, if you happen to own a food processor, you can add the dry ingredients (flour, baking powder, light brown sugar, salt and baking soda) to the food processor and pulse a few times to combine. Sprinkle the cubed butter on top of the dry ingredients and pulse a few more times until it forms pea-sized clumps. Then transfer the mixture to a large mixing bowl, stir in the buttermilk, and continue on with the recipe as directed.

(Video) How To Make Homemade Buttermilk Biscuits

Arranging the biscuits on the baking sheet:If you prefer your biscuits to have crispy sides, like I do, you can space them evenly apart on the baking sheet. Or if you would prefer taller biscuits with softer sides, you can place them side-by-side so that they are touching on the baking sheet (or you could opt to bake them in a cast-iron pan or pie plate instead).

Source: Recipe very slightly adapted from Food.com.

FAQs

What is the secret to making good biscuits? ›

The secret to excellent biscuits is COLD BUTTER. Really cold. Many times the biscuit dough gets worked so much that the butter softens before the biscuits even go in the oven. Try cutting the butter into small pieces and stick back in the fridge pulling out only when ready to incorporate into the dough.

At what temperature should you bake biscuits? ›

Bake the biscuits at 450°F until golden brown, about 12 to 15 minutes. TIP: Make sure your oven is at the right temperature as it needs to be nice and hot! I like to use an oven thermometer to make sure, my oven will often say it's preheated when it's really 15 to 20°F cooler.

What makes biscuits rise and fluffy? ›

Cold butter is key to making your biscuits fluffy. Warm butter will be absorbed into the flour and prevent them becoming all fluffy. Its similar to making pie crust. Cold butter will not be fully absorbed by the flour which means you will have small chunks visible in the dough.

How do you make Paula Deen's buttermilk biscuits? ›

Ingredients
  1. 4 cups self-rising flour.
  2. 2 teaspoons sugar.
  3. 1 teaspoon kosher salt.
  4. 1 cup cold unsalted butter, cubed.
  5. 1 ½ cups cold whole buttermilk.
  6. 2 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted.
  7. butter, for serving.

What is the best flour for buttermilk biscuits? ›

Interestingly, the go-to product for Southern biscuits is an all-purpose flour made by White Lily, though it is essentially pastry flour because it has a very low protein content.

Are biscuits better with butter or shortening? ›

So what's the final verdict? Butter is the winner here. The butter biscuits were moister with that wonderful butter taste and melt-in-your mouth texture. I'd be curious to test out substituting half or just two tablespoons of the butter with shortening to see if you get the best of both.

How long do biscuits take in the oven? ›

HEAT oven to 375°F (or 350°F for nonstick cookie sheet). PLACE biscuits 1 to 2 inches apart on ungreased cookie sheet. BAKE 11 to 15 minutes or until golden brown.

Should biscuit dough be cold before baking? ›

But if you chill your pan of biscuits in the fridge before baking, not only will the gluten relax (yielding more tender biscuits), the butter will harden up. And the longer it takes the butter to melt as the biscuits bake, the more chance they have to rise high and maintain their shape. So, chill... and chill.

What does adding an egg to biscuit dough do? ›

Eggs, Velie explains...
  • Create a richer flavor.
  • Work in tandem with the baking powder to leaven the biscuits for extra height.
  • Tenderize (due to the added fat in the yolk).
  • Contribute to a more golden-brown color (the additional protein contributes to the Maillard reaction).
10 Feb 2017

How do you make a cup of self rising flour? ›

How to make self-rising flour out of all-purpose flour
  1. For every cup of self-rising flour called for in your recipe, measure flour carefully. You want 1 level cup (125 grams) all-purpose flour.
  2. Add 1½ teaspoons (6 grams) baking powder and ¼ teaspoon (1 gram) kosher salt.
  3. Whisk to combine.
18 May 2021

Are biscuits American? ›

It is made with baking powder as a chemical leavening agent rather than yeast, and at times is called baking powder biscuit to differentiate it from other types.
...
Biscuit (bread)
Biscuits with jam
TypeQuick bread
Place of originUnited States
Main ingredientsFlour, baking powder, butter or shortening or lard, buttermilk
3 more rows

Should you let biscuit dough rest? ›

Cake flour, a low-protein flour that is available in supermarkets from Boston to Chicago, north to Seattle and down to Los Angeles, makes a fine biscuit. Standard Northern all-purpose flour does as well, especially if you allow the dough to rest for 30 minutes or so before cutting it out and baking.

Should you sift flour for biscuits? ›

Also, sifting the flour and other dry ingredients will give you a smoother, airier dough. You don't even need a flour sifter to do this. A wire mesh strainer will work just fine.

What does cream of tartar do for biscuits? ›

In the presence of a liquid, the acidity of the cream of tartar activates the baking soda, causing it to start bubbling away, and that, in turn, is what makes the biscuits rise.

What makes a high quality biscuit? ›

The following characteristics are important: Texture – open, flaky, short, depending on the product. Density/volume – low density gives more volume and a lighter bite. Bite/mouth feel – crispiness, softness, smoothness, crunchiness...

Are biscuits better with all-purpose or self-rising flour? ›

"A good biscuit starts with good flour," says Jason Roy, owner of Biscuit Head. Like many Southern cooks, he uses self-rising flour because it's pre-mixed to include a blend of hard and soft wheat as well as a leavening ingredient for the perfect rise—something you can't get in plain all-purpose, cake, or pastry flour.

Should I use bread flour or all-purpose flour for biscuits? ›

all-purpose flour – this flour has plenty of gluten developing protein (10-12%), but not as much as bread flour, which makes it more suitable for many cakes, cookies, biscuits and pie dough.

Why are Cracker Barrel biscuits so good? ›

"All of our food is made fresh. Biscuits are made from scratch, along with cornbread. All of our food comes off of a truck and then made-to-order," Reddit user Sanguine, an employee at one of the top 10 Cracker Barrels (allegedly), stated in response to a comment.

Should Crisco be cold for biscuits? ›

Like pastry dough, biscuits get their tender crumb and layers from the suspension of fat in flour. The fat, be it butter, lard, or vegetable shortening, needs to be dispersed throughout the dough while still in its solid state, so warm or room-temperature liquid or fat will disrupt this process.

What is the correct ratio for biscuits? ›

How to work with a ratio. Knowing that biscuits have a ratio of 1:2:3, that is 1 part fat, 2 parts liquid, and 3 parts flour, by weight, you can use this to make a batch of biscuits, big or small.

Which is better in biscuits baking soda or baking powder? ›

1. Unless you want cakey cookies, avoid using baking powder: The cookies made with both the single- and double-acting baking powders were just too darn cakey. 2. Baking soda helps cookies spread more than baking powder.

What kind of flour is best for biscuits? ›

Cake flour will give you a lighter, fluffier biscuit, but the outer crust won't have as much bite to it. Conversely, all-purpose flour will provide more bite, but it'll be a drier, less airy biscuit. The solution: Use half cake flour and half all-purpose flour.

Should biscuit dough be cold before baking? ›

But if you chill your pan of biscuits in the fridge before baking, not only will the gluten relax (yielding more tender biscuits), the butter will harden up. And the longer it takes the butter to melt as the biscuits bake, the more chance they have to rise high and maintain their shape. So, chill... and chill.

Why are my homemade biscuits so crumbly? ›

When the fat is cut too small, after baking there will be more, smaller air pockets left by the melting fat. The result is a baked product that crumbles. When cutting in shortening and other solid fats, cut only until the pieces of shortening are 1/8- to 1/4-inch in size.

How much baking powder do you use per cup of flour? ›

For each cup of all-purpose flour, you will need 1 ½ teaspoons of baking powder and ¼ teaspoon of salt.

What happens if I use baking powder instead of baking soda? ›

Baking powder may be used as a substitute for baking soda. Still, its leavening power is not as strong as that of plain baking soda. As a result, you'll need to use a greater quantity of baking powder to get the same final product.

What happens if I use baking powder instead of baking soda in cookies? ›

In addition, baking powder produces a slightly different texture in cookies than baking soda does. While baking soda will create a coarse, chewy cookie texture, baking powder will produce a light, fine cookie texture. To achieve the best cookie results, use a double-acting baking powder as a substitute.

What makes a high quality biscuit? ›

The following characteristics are important: Texture – open, flaky, short, depending on the product. Density/volume – low density gives more volume and a lighter bite. Bite/mouth feel – crispiness, softness, smoothness, crunchiness...

Are biscuits better with all-purpose or self-rising flour? ›

"A good biscuit starts with good flour," says Jason Roy, owner of Biscuit Head. Like many Southern cooks, he uses self-rising flour because it's pre-mixed to include a blend of hard and soft wheat as well as a leavening ingredient for the perfect rise—something you can't get in plain all-purpose, cake, or pastry flour.

Why do you put cream of tartar in biscuits? ›

In the presence of a liquid, the acidity of the cream of tartar activates the baking soda, causing it to start bubbling away, and that, in turn, is what makes the biscuits rise.

Should you brush butter on biscuits before baking? ›

Brush biscuits with melted butter. Bake 10-14 minutes or until lightly browned. Stir together softened butter and preserves in bowl until well mixed.

How many times do you knead biscuit dough? ›

Dough will not be completely smooth. Gather dough into a ball and knead on lightly floured surface quickly and gently, about 6 to 8 times, just until no longer sticky. The kneading is meant only to flatten the pieces of fat into flakes, not to blend fat completely with the flour.

Why do you push down the dough with your thumb before baking? ›

More importantly, why do you do it? Punching down is a common technique used in bread baking and it is essential to almost every yeast bread you bake. Punching down deflates the dough and releases the air so that you can knead it and form it into loaves or other shapes.

Should you let biscuit dough rest? ›

Cake flour, a low-protein flour that is available in supermarkets from Boston to Chicago, north to Seattle and down to Los Angeles, makes a fine biscuit. Standard Northern all-purpose flour does as well, especially if you allow the dough to rest for 30 minutes or so before cutting it out and baking.

How can I get my biscuits to rise higher? ›

Make sure you chill the butter for 30 minutes (it will cool faster when cut into pieces). Doing so ensures that the fat doesn't melt and produce greasy, leaden biscuits. Then heat the oven to 500 degrees; the high heat produces maximum steam, which encourages the biscuits to rise as high as they possibly can.

Should homemade biscuits touch when baking? ›

When you set the biscuits on the baking sheet, make sure the sides are touching. As they bake, they will cling to each other, rising bigger and taller. A hot oven helps biscuits bake—and rise—quickly.

Videos

1. BUTTERMILK BISCUITS MADE FROM SCRATCH ❤
(Rachel cooks with love ❤)
2. How to Make Flaky Biscuits
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3. HOW TO MAKE FLUFFY BISCUITS | biscuit mixing method
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