Food Waste in America: Facts and Statistics | Rubicon (2022)

Food waste in America has skyrocketed in recent years, with 103 million tons (206 billion pounds) of food waste generated in 2018, according to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA); the equivalent of over 450,000 Statue of Liberties.

This is a shocking statistic which unfortunately becomes less surprising the more you learn about the growing problem of food waste in America.

Globally, we waste a third of all food produced for human consumption, according to the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations (UN). In the United States, that equates to approximately one pound of food wasted per person per day. If we keep this up, reports estimate that in ten years, we’ll waste the equivalent of 66 tons of food per second across the globe.

What is Food Waste?

Before we go any further, here’s a quick primer on the basics of food waste:

Rubicon’s mission is to end waste, in all of its forms. In this article, we’re going to look at the issues surrounding food waste in the U.S. compared to the rest of the world. We’re going to look at what causes food waste at every level of the food supply chain; and how to reduce it. And we’re going to uncover the most interesting food waste statistics out there.

Keep reading to learn more about food waste in America.

How Much Food is Wasted in America?

Each day in the United States approximately one pound of food per person is wasted. This equates to 103 million tons (206 billion pounds) of food waste generated in America in 2017, or between 30-40 percent of the food supply, according to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA).

(Video) Top Food Waste Statistics of 2022

How much food is wasted in the U.S. can be seen directly through its monetary losses. The annual food waste in America has an approximate value of $161 billion, while the average American family of four throws out $1,500 in wasted food per year.

As it stands, the U.S. is the worldwide leader in food waste generation, with the majority of wasted food being sent to landfills. In fact, food waste is the number one material in American landfills, accounting for 24.1 percent of all municipal solid waste (MSW) according to the EPA.

How did we get here? Knowing how much food is wasted in America each year is only the first step toward tackling a problem that is bigger than the simple monetary loss. The reality of food waste in America is that we live in a country in which more than 54 million people are food insecure (18 million of which are children) according to 2020 data collected by Feeding America. These numbers are up from 37 million and 11 million, respectively, in 2019, with the sharp rise in food insecurity due to the effects of the COVID-19 public health emergency and the subsequent economic downturn. (For more food waste statistics, scroll down to the “Food Waste Facts and Statistics” section below.)

What Causes Food Waste in America?

The causes of food waste in America go far beyond just tossing our leftovers in the trash, and they are crucial to understand in order to reduce our nation’s collective food waste going forward.

From production and supply, to our tendency to overpurchase, to the unrealistic aesthetic standards we have come to expect from our fruits and vegetables, these are the three main causes of food waste in America:

Production and Supply Chain

Food wastage occurs at every step of the supply chain, with different types of foods being more or less likely to be lost at each step.

According to data from the United States, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand that was collected by the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC), 20 percent of fruit and vegetables are lost during production, 12 percent are lost at the distribution and retail level, and a further 28 percent are lost at the consumer level. Seafood faces a similar fate, with 11 percent lost during production, 5 percent lost during processing and packaging, 9.5 percent lost at the distribution and retail level, and a further 33 percent lost at the consumer level. (For more on the specifics of food loss, this paper from Dana Gunders is a must-read.)

Unrealistic Aesthetic Standards

When you’re in the produce aisle at your local supermarket, do you ever put back carrots, potatoes, zucchinis, or any other fruit or vegetable because it doesn’t look as straight, slender, round, or otherwise how we have been conditioned to believe this item should look?

(Video) Food waste is the world's dumbest problem

Food waste in America is exacerbated by unrealistic aesthetic standards for our produce. You’re not alone in not picking up that misshapen carrot in the produce aisle. Grocery stores have learned over time that consumers don’t tend to purchase misshapen produce. As a result, many stores stop accepting them from their suppliers. Thankfully there are outlets for misshapen produce; restaurants don’t care what their carrots look like so long as they can turn them into delicious dishes on the plate, and start-ups such as Imperfect Foods, Misfits Market, and Hungry Harvest make it easy for consumers to receive “ugly produce” right to their door.

Portion Sizes and Overpurchasing

While not the most dramatic cause of food wastage, increased portion sizes in schools, restaurants, and the home leads to overpurchasing. Subsequently, more food is thrown out because it’s gone bad.

Restaurants want to have enough food to serve their customers, so they overbuy and throw out what goes bad. At the consumer level, however, you have the power to ensure you purchase only what you need, you serve portion sizes that work for you and your family, and you don’t throw out food too early.

What are the Effects of Food Waste?

While the negative effects of food waste in America are numerous, this article will focus on the three largest.

Environmental Impact

The environmental impact of food waste in America cannot be undersold. As food rots in a landfill, it emits methane, a greenhouse gas 28 to 36 times more potent than the carbon that comes out of passenger vehicles.

Landfills are the third-largest industrial emitter of methane, with food waste alone representing 8 percent of total global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. While it is possible to offset the harm of these emissions through organics recycling, composting, and anaerobic digestion, the best way to reduce these emissions is to waste less food in the first place.

Food Insecurity and Global Hunger

While mentioned above, it bears repeating here. We live in a country in which more than 54 million people are food insecure (18 million of which are children) according to 2020 data collected by Feeding America, meaning they lack reliable access to a sufficient quantity of affordable, nutritious food. These numbers are up from 37 million and 11 million, respectively, in 2019, due to COVID-19.

The fact that we as a country are wasting 30-40 percent of the food supply each year when more than 54 million Americans are food insecure is unconscionable.

(Video) Food Waste Statistics

Wasted Natural Resources

While rotting food in our country’s landfills causes harm to our environment after it is wasted, allowing perfectly good food to go to waste is also wasteful of the natural resources that helped this food come to fruition in the first place.

When we waste food, we waste the water, energy, and physical labor it took to produce, package, and ship this food. We waste the fuel that was used to transport this food from one part of the country to another. When we waste food, it’s not just the food itself that is being wasted.

How to Reduce Food Waste in America

Reducing food waste in America is going to take some time. Highlighting food waste statistics and facts, such as those below, is a good way to help get the word out about this ever-growing problem, but our work can’t stop there.

As we just learned, there’s more to food waste than what we do and don’t eat. We’re wasting $161 billion annually (with the average American family of four throwing out $1,500 in wasted food per year) while depleting our natural resources, harming our environment, and wasting food that the more than 54 million food insecure people in the United States could benefit from.

Here are some ideas for what you can do to reduce food waste in America:

  • Put together a detailed shopping list before you go to the grocery store by planning your meals in advance—and avoid impulse purchases.
  • Take leftover containers to restaurants. While some don’t provide takeout containers, they would be hard-pressed to stop you from using your own.
  • Recognize that while your eyes may be bigger than your stomach, your plate doesn’t have to be. Using smaller plates can help you to properly portion your food.
  • Don’t be afraid of an emptier fridge. When you can’t see the food you have purchased, you’re more likely to forget about it and let it rot.
  • Keep track of the food you’re throwing away the most to cut down on trends. Add a dollar sign value so you can see the impact it has on your budget.
  • Expiration dates are misleading and nonstandardized, leading many to toss out perfectly good food. Trust your sense of smell, and your gut, before throwing items away.
  • Read the EPA’s “Too Good to Waste” implementation guide and toolkit to reduce wasteful food management practices.

The Food Recovery Hierarchy

When we talk about reducing food waste in America we would be remiss to not mention the Food Recovery Hierarchy.

Food Waste in America: Facts and Statistics | Rubicon (1)

Developed by the EPA, the Food Recovery Hierarchy prioritizes actions businesses and individuals alike can take to prevent and divert wasted food. As you can see, source reduction, or simply purchasing less food in the first place, is number one. This is followed by food donations to those in need, sending food scraps to animal feed, then industrial uses including anaerobic digestion and ethanol facilities, before moving on to composting.

Hopefully, food waste is never landfilled because it has so many beneficial uses.

(Video) Food Waste

Food Waste Facts and Statistics

The following food waste facts and statistics tell the story of food waste in America.

As I noted earlier on in this article, reading food waste statistics that tell us just how much food is wasted in America on an annual basis is a good way to help get the word out about the problem of food wastage in this country—but we must go further to reduce food waste at every level of the food supply chain.

If you are a restaurant owner looking to implement food waste reduction programs, or you’re a business owner looking to run a more sustainable business, reach out to Rubicon’s Sustainability team at sustainability@rubicon.com and we will be happy to help.

Without further ado, here are 20 of the most interesting food waste facts and statistics:

  1. 103 million tons (206 billion pounds) of food waste was generated in the United States in 2018, the equivalent of over 450,000 Statue of Liberties.
  2. An estimated 1.3 billion tonnes of food is wasted globally each year, one third of all food produced for human consumption.
  3. In ten years, the United States will waste the equivalent of 66 tons of food per second across the globe.
  4. If food waste was a country, it would be the third largest emitter of greenhouse gas emissions in the world after the United States and China.
  5. The United States wastes 30-40 percent of its food supply each year.
  6. The annual food waste in America has an approximate value of $161 billion.
  7. The average American family of four throws out $1,500 in food per year.
  8. Food waste is the number one material in America’s landfills, accounting for 24.1 percent of all municipal solid waste (MSW).
  9. More than 54 million people are food insecure (18 million of which are children) according to 2020 data, accounting for one in six people. These numbers are up from 37 million and 11 million, respectively, in 2019, due to COVID-19.
  10. Approximately 38 percent of grain products are lost, 50 percent of seafood, 52 percent of fruits and vegetables, 22 percent of meat, and 20 percent of milk.
  11. As food rots in a landfill, it emits methane, a greenhouse gas 28 to 36 times more potent than the carbon that comes out of passenger vehicles.
  12. Food waste represents 8 percent of total global greenhouse gas emissions.
  13. Only 6.3 percent of food waste in America was composted in 2017.
  14. The healthier you eat, the more important it is that you stay on top of your consumption. If you buy perishable food in bulk, such as fruits, vegetables, and meat, organize your refrigerator so what you need to eat first is up front and visible.
  15. Americans discard approximately 35 percent (204 million pounds) of edible turkey meat each year, the majority after the Thanksgiving holiday.
  16. Food is often safe to eat even after it “expires.” Expiration dates are misleading and nonstandardized, leading many to toss out perfectly good food.
  17. Global preferences for a western diet consisting of a high intake of carbohydrates, sugar, and sodium are major contributors to environmental burdens such as greenhouse gas emissions and land use.
  18. Shrink wrapping produce helps to reduce food waste by increasing its shelf life. But remember to recycle the shrink wrap and other plastic bags, wraps, and film that are clean and dry.
  19. Lack of awareness of basic nutrition adds to food waste among consumers. While many people believe it’s better to buy fresh food, in reality, frozen food products often retain more nutrients while lasting longer.
  20. The size of your refrigerator can impact the amount of food you waste. You’re more likely to forget about food you have, improperly store your food, and buy more than you can eat before it goes bad.

To learn more about Rubicon’s work transforming the entire category of waste and recycling, be sure to download our inaugural Environmental, Social, and Governance (ESG) Report.

If you have any questions about food waste in America, or any of the food waste facts and statistics on this page, you can reach out to Rubicon’s Sustainability team directly at sustainability@rubicon.com, or contact our sales team at (844) 479-1507.

Ryan Cooper is Director of Circular Economy Solutions at Rubicon. To stay ahead of Rubicon’s announcements of new partnerships and collaborations around the world, be sure to follow us on LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter, or contact us today.

(Video) What is food waste?

Sources: 1, 7, 8, 11, 13, 20) Environmental Protection Agency (EPA); 2, 12) Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO); 3, 19) Boston Consulting Group (BCG) Henderson Institute; 4) World Resources Institute; 5, 10) Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC); 6) U.S. Food and Drugs Administration; 9) Feeding America; 14) Municipal Waste Association; 15) Waste Dive; 16) Reuters; 17) United States Department of Agriculture (USDA); 18) Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC) News.

FAQs

What percentage of food is wasted in the US? ›

How much food waste is there in the United States? In the United States, food waste is estimated at between 30-40 percent of the food supply.

What are some statistics for food waste? ›

Global Waste Facts

One third of all food produced is lost or wasted –around 1.3 billion tonnes of food –costing the global economy close to $940 billion each year. Up to 10% of global greenhouse gases comes from food that is produced, but not eaten.

How much food is wasted in the US in 2020? ›

80 billion lbs of food is thrown away. 40% of the US food supply is wasted. $1600 worth of produce per family is wasted.

How much food does the US waste everyday? ›

Each day in the United States approximately one pound of food per person is wasted. This equates to 103 million tons (206 billion pounds) of food waste generated in America in 2017, or between 30-40 percent of the food supply, according to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA).

Why do Americans waste so much food? ›

Feelings of guilt: 77 percent feel a general sense of guilt when throwing away food. At the same time, only 58 percent indicated they understand that throwing away food is bad for the environment, and only 42 percent believe wasted food is a major source of wasted money.

Which country wastes the most food 2022? ›

Here's some “food” for thought: While the world wastes about 1.4 billion tons of food2 every year, the United States discards more food than any other country in the world: nearly 40 million tons — 80 billion pounds — every year.

How much food does the US waste every year? ›

Each year, 108 billion pounds of food is wasted in the United States. That equates to 130 billion meals and more than $408 billion in food thrown away each year.

Did you know facts food waste? ›

Every tonne of food waste ending in landfill produces approximately 4.2 tonnes of greenhouse gases. If it were a country, food waste would be the third highest emitter of greenhouse gases behind the USA and China!

Who is the main cause of food waste? ›

Common causes of food waste in restaurants include overbuying, overproduction, and spoilage. Overbuying is often a result of inadequate forecasting of consumer demand and the large quantities of food that restaurants typically need to purchase at one time.

Which country wastes the most food? ›

China came first with an estimated 91.6 million tonnes of discarded food annually, followed by India's 68.8 million tonnes.

Which age group wastes the most food? ›

Research shows that young people aged 18-34 waste proportionally more food than other age groups2. Students are a key audience within this age group, and in order to help them reduce their food waste, we need to gain a better understanding of what foods they are wasting, and why.

How many people are starving in the US? ›

According to the USDA, more than 34 million people, including 9 million children, in the United States are food insecure. The pandemic has increased food insecurity among families with children and communities of color, who already faced hunger at much higher rates before the pandemic.

What food do Americans throw away the most? ›

Top five most wasted foods (and ways to save them from the bin)
  • #1 Bread. Over 240 million slices of bread are chucked away every year. ...
  • #2 Milk. Around 5.9 million glasses of milk are poured down the sink every year, but it's so easy to use it up. ...
  • #3 Potatoes. We discard 5.8 million potatoes each year. ...
  • #4 Cheese. ...
  • #5 Apples.

How food waste affects the economy? ›

At the consumption stage, food waste is responsible for about 55% of the total environmental costs, and increases food prices at all stages of the value chain by 11%. This causes production and labor loss, which impairs productivity in the economy.

How can we stop food waste in America? ›

Here are some easy actions you can take to re-connect to food and what it stands for:
  1. Adopt a healthier, more sustainable diet. ...
  2. Buy only what you need. ...
  3. Pick ugly fruit and vegetables. ...
  4. Store food wisely. ...
  5. Understand food labelling. ...
  6. Start small. ...
  7. Love your leftovers. ...
  8. Put your food waste to use.
29 Sept 2020

Do Americans care about food waste? ›

Most Americans are aware that food waste is a problem, are concerned about it, and say they work to reduce their own waste, but nearly three quarters believe that they waste less food than the national average, new research suggests.

When did food waste start in America? ›

1900: industrial revolution. Families begin wasting more food as it continues to cost less and be more easily available due to industrialisation. Because food was often produced in other areas than in the family yard, overproduction received little attention because it was of out-of-sight, out-of-mind.

How much food ends up in landfills? ›

The estimated 35.3 million tons of wasted food that went to landfills in 2018 represents 24.1 percent of all MSW landfilled.
...
MANAGEMENT PATHWAYQUANTITY MANAGED (TONS)PERCENTAGE MANAGED
Sewer/Wastewater Treatment3,743,2295.9%
Landfill35,277,54355.9%
Controlled Combustion7,552,70512.0%
7 more rows
23 Nov 2021

Which country has least food waste? ›

Denmark. Thanks to the dedication and perseverance of a Russian-born graphic designer, Denmark reduced food waste across the country by 25% in just 5 years!

Which country is first in food waste? ›

Statistics show that China wastes 50 million tonnes of grain annually, accounting for one-tenth of the country's total grain output. It is also estimated that enough food to feed 200 million people, about one-sixth of the country's population, goes to waste annually.

Which country is the most wasteful? ›

As a nation, Americans generate more waste than any other nation in the world with 4.5 pounds (2.0 kg) of municipal solid waste (MSW) per person per day, fifty five percent of which is contributed as residential garbage.

Why is food waste a problem? ›

Food waste is a problem because it costs Americans billions of dollars in lost revenue, puts a tax on natural and human resources, and harms the environment by contributing to global warming and climate change when food waste is added to landfills and produces the greenhouse gas methane.

How much food do students waste? ›

“In our study, we found plate waste ranging from 27% to 53% of the food served.” The food-waste audit conducted by the researchers was unusually thorough, said Costello; they combined direct weighing and digital photography to quantify the amount and specific types of foods wasted.

How much waste does the US produce? ›

Each American produces more than 1,700 pounds of it a year, the report's authors found, adding up to 239 million tons annually. Do China and India generate more trash? Yes, together they're on the hook for 27 percent of the world's garbage.

Why is food waste so high? ›

Food is lost or wasted for a variety of reasons: bad weather, processing problems, overproduction and unstable markets cause food loss long before it arrives in a grocery store, while overbuying, poor planning and confusion over labels and safety contribute to food waste at stores and in homes.

How much of the world's food is wasted? ›

Roughly a third of the world's food is wasted. That's about 1.3 billion tons a year. The world loses an astounding quantity of food every year.

How can we reduce food waste? ›

Here are 7 ways you can reduce food waste in your kitchen:
  1. Take an inventory. Take stock of your pantry, refrigerator and freezer before going to the store to prevent overbuying.
  2. Create a meal plan. ...
  3. Save and eat leftovers safely. ...
  4. Store food appropriately. ...
  5. Buy "ugly" foods. ...
  6. Compost. ...
  7. Use leftovers creatively.
4 Jun 2021

What is the root of food waste? ›

The Root of the Issue

54% percent of global food wastage occurs "upstream" (food production, post-harvest handling, storage) and 46% of it happens "downstream (processing, distribution, consumption). The further down the food chain that food loss or waste occurs, the greater the environmental impact.

How does food waste affect society? ›

Food waste is not only a social cost, but it contributes to growing environmental problems like climate change, experts say, with the production of food consuming vast quantities of water, fertilizer and land. The fuel that is burned to process, refrigerate and transport it also adds to the environmental cost.

How does food waste affect poverty? ›

For millions of people in low-income countries, this food waste happens at harvest time. Poor storage leads to pest infestations or mold that ruin crops before they can be eaten. Along with chronic poverty, conflict and natural disasters, food waste is one of the root causes of hunger worldwide.

Which category of food is wasted the most in American homes? ›

The most common types of food waste tend to be perishable items like dairy and meat products, as well as fresh produce. Some 50 percent of respondents from the United States stated that they throw away dairy products that have gone bad most often.

What are 10 ways to save food? ›

  1. 10 Ways To Stop Food Waste. 4/27/2021. ...
  2. Avoid buying in bulk. ​A key to reducing food waste is to shop smart for your groceries. ...
  3. Create a meal schedule. ...
  4. Try to save leftovers. ...
  5. Store your food correctly. ...
  6. Don't be afraid to try out new recipes. ...
  7. Don't judge your produce by its cover. ...
  8. Preserve your food.
27 Apr 2021

Which continent wastes the most food? ›

Europe and North America are the biggest culprits, wasting far more food than other parts of the world — 95 kilograms (209 pounds) per capita each year or more in some cases — while consumers in South and Southeastern Asia and sub-Saharan Africa throw away only 6 to 11 kilograms (13 to 24 pounds) annually.

Who is the target audience of food waste? ›

Audience: Food retailers, suppliers, and businesses. The target audience for this paper are food retailers, suppliers, and businesses because they are utilizing different marketing strategies and practices that contribute to food waste.

What causes food waste in schools? ›

The foodservice provider emerges as the most significant factor in influencing the generation of food waste at schools; other relevant factors are the amount of food prepared and the serving size, the kitchen location, the food provided for the mid-morning break, the menu composition and the geographical area.

Why do college students waste food? ›

A recent study found that college students may have a higher tendency to waste food than other age groups because food-management behaviors haven't been necessary or learned yet in this stage of life.

How many people are hungry in the US 2022? ›

From June 1 to June 13, 2022, almost 24 million households—including 11.6 million households with children under the age of 18—reported that they sometimes or often did not have enough to eat during the week.

Why is hunger in America a problem? ›

In America, hunger is caused by poverty and financial resources at both the national and local levels. 45 million Americans rely on stipends from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) to buy food each month, according to the USDA. 2/3 of these benefits go to households with children.

What percentage of America is starving? ›

Hunger Quick Facts for 2021

One in 26 (3.8 percent) of households in the U.S. experienced very low food security, a more severe form of food insecurity, where households report regularly skipping meals or reducing intake because they could not afford more food.

How much food is wasted in the US 2021? ›

According to the nonprofit organization Feeding America, Americans waste more than $218 billion each year on food, with dairy products being the food item we toss out the most. The average American family of four throws out $1,600 a year in produce.

How much food is wasted each year in America? ›

Each year, 108 billion pounds of food is wasted in the United States. That equates to 130 billion meals and more than $408 billion in food thrown away each year.

Which country wastes the most food? ›

China came first with an estimated 91.6 million tonnes of discarded food annually, followed by India's 68.8 million tonnes.

How much food is wasted in the world 2021? ›

Globally, the production of food accounts for up to 37% of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and requires significant resources including land, energy, and water. However, up to 40% is wasted .

Did you know facts about food waste? ›

Every tonne of food waste ending in landfill produces approximately 4.2 tonnes of greenhouse gases. If it were a country, food waste would be the third highest emitter of greenhouse gases behind the USA and China!

What are the main causes of food waste? ›

Common causes of food waste in restaurants include overbuying, overproduction, and spoilage. Overbuying is often a result of inadequate forecasting of consumer demand and the large quantities of food that restaurants typically need to purchase at one time.

Which age group wastes the most food? ›

Research shows that young people aged 18-34 waste proportionally more food than other age groups2. Students are a key audience within this age group, and in order to help them reduce their food waste, we need to gain a better understanding of what foods they are wasting, and why.

How many people are starving in the US? ›

According to the USDA, more than 34 million people, including 9 million children, in the United States are food insecure. The pandemic has increased food insecurity among families with children and communities of color, who already faced hunger at much higher rates before the pandemic.

How food waste affects the economy? ›

At the consumption stage, food waste is responsible for about 55% of the total environmental costs, and increases food prices at all stages of the value chain by 11%. This causes production and labor loss, which impairs productivity in the economy.

How many Americans are food insecure? ›

Food-insecure households include those with low food security and very low food security. 10.2 percent (13.5 million) of U.S. households were food insecure at some time during 2021. Essentially unchanged from 10.5 percent in 2020.

Which country has least food waste? ›

Denmark. Thanks to the dedication and perseverance of a Russian-born graphic designer, Denmark reduced food waste across the country by 25% in just 5 years!

Which country is first in food waste? ›

Statistics show that China wastes 50 million tonnes of grain annually, accounting for one-tenth of the country's total grain output. It is also estimated that enough food to feed 200 million people, about one-sixth of the country's population, goes to waste annually.

Which category of food is wasted the most in American homes? ›

The most common types of food waste tend to be perishable items like dairy and meat products, as well as fresh produce. Some 50 percent of respondents from the United States stated that they throw away dairy products that have gone bad most often.

Which country is the most wasteful? ›

As a nation, Americans generate more waste than any other nation in the world with 4.5 pounds (2.0 kg) of municipal solid waste (MSW) per person per day, fifty five percent of which is contributed as residential garbage.

How big is the problem of food waste? ›

Nearly one in three people in the world (2.37 billion) did not have access to adequate food in 2020 (3). While worldwide hunger continues to rise, an estimated one-third of food produced is lost or wasted, equaling around 1.3 billion tonnes of food wasted (4).

Which continent wastes the most food? ›

Europe and North America are the biggest culprits, wasting far more food than other parts of the world — 95 kilograms (209 pounds) per capita each year or more in some cases — while consumers in South and Southeastern Asia and sub-Saharan Africa throw away only 6 to 11 kilograms (13 to 24 pounds) annually.

Videos

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4. Food loss and waste facts – Roots and tubers
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