Beth Moore is not the first Baptist to journey to the Anglican Church (2023)

When Beth Moore left the Southern Baptist Convention in 2021 and soon after was seen in a photo serving Communion at an Anglican church, the social media outrage became a reminder that few people seem to rile up Southern Baptist and conservative evangelical TheoBros as much as Beth Moore.

At the Truth Matters Conference in 2019, which was a gathering to celebrate John MacArthur’s five decades of ministry, Todd Friel asked MacArthur to play a word association game with the two words “Beth Moore.” To which, MacArthur famously replied, “Go home.”

MacArthur’s henchman Phil Johnson added, “The word that comes to my mind is ‘narcissistic.’”

Then MacArthur jumped back in to say: “Just because you have the skill to sell jewelry on the TV sales channel doesn’t mean you should be preaching. … The church is caving in to women preachers. … Women are not allowed to preach.”

“Few people seem to rile up Southern Baptist and conservative evangelical TheoBros as much as Beth Moore.”

Attacked for being a Baptist and then for not being a Baptist

Over the next two years, many within conservative evangelicalism followed MacArthur’s lead and continued piling on.

In a recent episodeof The Holy Post podcast, Phil Vischer reflected: “There was this movement in 2020 of people saying, ‘We have to be open to more perspectives. We have to hear more voices. We can’t always assume that we the majority — in this case white men primarily — are the ones who know what’s right about everything. … I describe 2021 as ‘The Empire Strikes Back.’ … There was such as strong pushback on people like Beth Moore and Russell Moore, who now neither are in the Southern Baptist Convention.”

Russell Moore was then head of the SBC Ethics and Religious Liberty Commission but resigned last summer rather than continue to fight the far-right flank of the SBC who thought he was a liberal. He now works for Christianity Today.

Regarding Beth Moore, Vischer said, “She was attacked for being a Southern Baptist but not quite towing the party line from the most conservative parts of the Southern Baptist Convention. Now she’s being attacked for not being a Southern Baptist.”

Vischer was referencing the fact that Beth Moore decidedto leave the SBC and joinSt. Timothy’s Anglican Church, a congregation within the theologically conservative Anglican Church in North America.

Beth Moore is not the first Baptist to journey to the Anglican Church (1)

Split image captured for social media and shared by critics of Beth Moore becoming an Anglican.

(Video) Beth Moore Seen Performing At Anglican Church Service

WhenReformation Charlotterecently discovered that Beth Moore was wearing a robe and serving Communion in her new church, they called her an apostate, posted screenshots of the service and of the church’s volunteer schedule, and reminded the world of their prediction that “it would only be a matter of time before Beth Moore becomes full-on gay-affirming.”

But Moore’s journey from Baptist churches to Anglican churches is not unique. In fact, it is a journey many evangelicals take, including myself. There are many examples of Southern Baptist pastors, scholars and laity alike finding their way to the Anglican Church.

Of course, I am no longer a member of an Anglican church because my spiritual journey kept going beyond where the Anglicans were willing to go. And I cannot speak for Beth Moore’s journey, especially since I am in very different theological spaces today than where she is. But I can share some insights as to why the Anglican Church attracted my Baptist-formed journey, and how the Anglican Church opened me up to life beyond it.

Learning the language with independent fundamental Baptists

I grew up in the very conservative world of the independent fundamental Baptists. We primarily were concerned with the holiness of God, which we defined as separateness and took very seriously as a call to be “in the world, but not of the world.”

We applied that separation mindset by creating detailed lists of rules about hair style, dress style, music style, and virtually every area of life one could imagine.

We married our attachment to rules to a desire to be seen as balanced. For example, we were not KJV only. But we only used the KJV. This supposedly moderate position allowed us to feel safe by only using the King James Version of the Bible without being categorized amongst the more extreme KJV-only factions of independent fundamental Baptists.

“While there was much to fear in this world, it was the world that introduced me to the language of Christianity.”

While there was much to fear in this world, it was the world that introduced me to the language of Christianity. It was there that I first learned the stories of the Bible, heard about Jesus and was introduced to life in community. This language would become the framework through which I would spend my life processing ultimate reality.

Still, these rules, set within the context of fearing the holiness and immanent judgment of God, cultivated deep wounds that eventually would lead me out of this subculture.

Cultivating my curiosity with Free Will Baptists

Most independent Baptists believe in the doctrine of eternal security, which teaches that once a person says and means the sinner’s prayer, they are saved forever. One unique part of my story within the world of independent fundamental Baptists, however, was that my family believed Christians could lose their salvation.

Our denial of eternal security eventually led us to join the Free Will Baptists, who believe in Baptist distinctives while leaving room for the possibility that some Christians might choose to walk away from God and lose their salvation.

“Our denial of eternal security eventually led us to join the Free Will Baptists.”

Most Baptists practice the two sacraments of believer’s baptism and communion. Free Will Baptists add foot washing as a third sacrament of the church. While I wasn’t looking forward to holding the dirty feet of the Sunday school director, and although I do not believe the Bible requires foot washing to be practiced by churches today, the exercise invited me to wonder if there might be more opportunities to see a divine presence in spiritual practices beyond what I had previously considered.

(Video) Beth Moore's New Denomination (From SBC to ACNA)

Free Will Baptists also tend to have less-detailed lists of rules than independent Baptists, which allowed me to explore learning to play the guitar in church. Our repertoire was almost exclusively hymns and Southern Gospel music. So it remained a pretty limited experience. But it opened my curiosity for how my wonder could be expressed musically.

Still, the fear of losing my salvation amidst the tensions of purity culture and Left-Behind culture proved to be too great for me to stay with the Free Will Baptists.

Becoming myself with baptistic community churches

After I enrolled at Bob Jones University in 2000, I spent the next 17 years in non-denominational community churches that would often admit to being “baptistic.”

These churches were Calvinistic and complementarian in their theology, along the lines of Grace to You, Desiring God and The Gospel Coalition. We were fully committed to biblical inerrancy while using the English Standard Version of the Bible. We were unapologetic about penal substitutionary atonement and eternal conscious torment. And we were committed to being distinct from the world, while being allowed to use modern music styles, drink alcohol and go to the movie theater.

Our appreciation for the preaching and worship of Sovereign Grace Churches, a movement that labels itself as both Calvinistic and charismatic, opened us up to some levels of interest in broader experiences of spiritual gifts as long as they followed what we believed were the Bible’s guidelines for exercising them.

“We were able to garner their financial support by assuring them that we were ‘baptistic.’”

Yet, like the Baptist churches I grew up in, we were fiercely independent. So because we lacked the structural support of a broader denomination, those of us who were involved with church planting turned to organizations like Acts 29 or independent supporting churches. Those who knew us often were independent fundamental Baptist churches who disapproved of our standards and styles and the absence of “Baptist” in our name. But we were able to garner their financial support by assuring them that we were “baptistic.”

The result of this world was one where I was free to explore and express my desires and passions, to become more truly myself, and yet where I was tied enough to my conservative background to be held back from asking my questions and exploring any cognitive dissonance that would arise.

During my final year and a half in these baptistic community churches, I was introduced to self-awareness through reading such authors as Henri Nouwen and Richard Rohr, Catholics who valued the contemplative life. As I opened up to seeing and loving myself through contemplation, I began to see and love my neighbors as well. With this expanding awareness and love, my questions deepened until I began to realize how my conservative evangelical theology had been cutting me off from myself and my neighbors. Eventually, my awareness of the power dynamics in these churches made me realize it was time to move on.

Converging my entire journey into the Anglican Church

For a number of months, I felt very exiled, wondering if there were any churches out there who understood where I was coming from and yet would welcome my current questions more freely. And that’s when I was introduced to an Anglican church.

Beth Moore is not the first Baptist to journey to the Anglican Church (2)

The Compass Rose

(Video) Best of 2021: Beth Moore, Part 2—What It Was Like to Leave the SBC

InThe Anglican Way, Thomas McKenzie uses a concept called “the compass rose” to describe the directions of the Christian life as a series of spectrums between the personal (evangelical) and the communal (catholic), between the here (charismatic) and there (orthodox), between being (contemplative) and doing (activist), and between stopping (conservative) and going (liberal).

Anglicanism gave me the freedom to exist at various points of these spectrums, from the more moderate middle to the outer edges. It seemed like a dream come true for someone whose journey developed in me the very complex blend of theological and ethical priorities the compass rose named.

For many people who come from conservative Baptist backgrounds, finding the Anglican communion feels like coming out of exile and returning home to everything that had been growing in you for years. Beth Moorerecently tweeted: “I love my church. I could cry about it. The Lord has so blessed me in the course of my life with wonderful church families. He entrusted many other enduring sorrows & hardships to me but somehow he chose that, just as church was a harbor for me in childhood, so it is in my aging.”

Opening up to all things new through the Anglican Way

The Anglican Church also began opening up new languages, curiosities and identities for me that I never imagined were possible.

The moment you walk into an Anglican service, one of the first things you’ll notice is the aroma of the incense. By the time you see the colors of the decor, hear the sound of singing, touch the hand of a friend, and taste the bread and wine, you will have experienced the present becoming of community and transcendence with all five senses.

The second thing you notice in Anglican services is the liturgy. For those who have spent their entire lives in non-liturgical spaces, this can be a bit of a culture shock, to sit through the amount of responsive readings and scripted prayers. But while my theology was shifting, the liturgies felt like anchors that were keeping me from getting swept away. And in the liturgy of the Eucharist, I could receive an experience of the presence of Christ with all my senses.

When the service ends, the Anglican Way is just beginning. Thomas McKenzie explains: “The Anglican Way developed in an agricultural society. … They didn’t experience a rigid distinction between the material world and the spiritual world. The church helped them remember the holiness of every moment by sanctifying (making holy) the natural patterns of the day.”

In addition to reciting liturgies throughout each day and week, Anglicans also utilize the church calendar. McKenzie says: “Beginning with the foundations of the Jewish calendar, the early church built a temple to God in time rather than space. Our spiritual ancestors measured out the days, weeks and months. They collected, sorted and named them. They put everything in place so that we, their children, would have a splendid palace in which to worship.”

In my experience, the Anglican Church became a cloister garden of particularly cultivated experiences that opened me to the universal reality across time and space. By engaging my five senses, I began to wonder how else I might embody the present becoming of community and transcendence with all things. By learning the liturgy, I became curious about other liturgies from other communities, including the liturgies of our Jewish, Muslim and Buddhist neighbors. By recognizing the spiritual in the material, I saw the significance of every person, plant and creature. And by experiencing the presence of Christ in the Eucharist, I began to receive the presence of Christ everywhere.

Expanding beyond the Anglican Way

One skill I’ve developed over the years within these various contexts has been to learn where people’s walls are. As a creative person, I tend to push over walls to discover what’s on the other side.

(Video) Raise the Roof - Part 1 | Beth Moore

With the Anglican Church, I began to realize how women could serve Communion and even become priests but noticed all the bishops were men.

With the Anglican church, I began to realize that theological perspectives were greatly varied, but that our children in our particular church would be formed by teachers and curriculum that promoted some of the very harmful retributive and complementarian perspectives that had so deeply wounded my wife and me.

“With the Anglican church, I began to realize that theological perspectives were greatly varied.”

With the Anglican Church, I began to realize how the Anglican Church in North America kept LGBTQ people on the other side of the walls. McKenzie explains that when the Episcopal Church named Gene Robinson, a gay man, as a bishop in 2003, it was the “straw that broke the camel’s back. … His teachings and his lifestyle are not in alignment with Anglican values and theology. … His consecration went against all that bishops are supposed to be.”

The fallout eventually led to the 2009 formation of the Anglican Church in North America. This explains why so many Southern Baptists who are thoughtful yet conservative, biblical yet not fundamentalist, open to diversity but not full inclusion, easily find a home in the U.S. version of the Anglican Church. One irony is that 30 years ago, during the last breakup of the SBC, ordained women and more liberal Southern Baptists sought refuge in the Episcopal Church before it birthed the Anglican Church through its own schism.

The Anglican Church drew me in from my Baptist heritage because it acknowledged my exile and gave me space to move. While I was there, it gave me a taste in the particular for what is true everywhere. But ultimately, it allowed harmful voices within its walls to speak to my children and built walls for women and LGBTQ people that I believed needed to be knocked down.

My Baptist-to-Anglican journey may be different than others. And as the rest of my life unfolds, I may not know all the particular ways I will experience community. But at each stage of my Baptist and Anglican journeys, I have experienced and cultivated a beauty that eventually expands me beyond walls and makes my exile my home.

Rick Pidcockis a freelance writer based in South Carolina. He is a former Clemons Fellow with BNG and recently completed a master of arts degree in worship from Northern Seminary. He is a stay-at-home father of five children and produces music under the artist name Provoke Wonder. Follow his blog atwww.rickpidcock.com

Related articles:

For Baptists-turned-Episcopalians, Anglican disagreement feels familiar

Dissident Episcopalians awarded $100 million worth of property as U.S. Supreme Court declines to take up Fort Worth case

Oprah’s interview with Meghan and Harry offers a lesson on when the ‘institution’ is the church | Analysis by Rick Pidcock

This article was made possible by generous gifts to the Mark Wingfield Fund for Interpretive Journalism.

(Video) Beth Moore Takes The Road To Rome!

FAQs

Who started the Anglican Church and why? ›

The Anglican Church originated when King Henry VIII split from the Roman Catholic Church in 1534, when the pope refused to grant the king an annulment. The Anglican Communion is made up of 46 independent churches, of which the US Episcopal Church is one.

Who was the first prominent leader of Baptists in New England? ›

Isaac Backus (January 9, 1724 – November 20, 1806) was a leading Baptist minister during the era of the American Revolution who campaigned against state-established churches in New England. Little is known of his childhood.
...
Isaac Backus.
The Reverend Isaac Backus
NationalityAmerican
3 more rows

Is Episcopalian the same as Anglican? ›

The Episcopal Church, based in the United States with additional dioceses elsewhere, is a member church of the worldwide Anglican Communion. It is a mainline Protestant denomination and is divided into nine provinces.

Who led the Anglican Mission? ›

The Anglican Mission has been led since late 2013 by Bishop Philip Jones, who succeeded Bishop Chuck Murphy after 14 years. The Mission Center for the AM is in Dallas, TX.

Do Anglicans pray to the Virgin Mary? ›

Roman Catholic and Orthodox Christians pray 'to' Mary (i.e. 'invocate'). Anglican tend to pray 'with' her (i.e. 'comprecate'). With her, we pray that we may bring birth to God's word in the world.

What are 3 beliefs of the Anglican Church? ›

In particular, the three creeds of the church (the Apostles' Creed, Nicene Creed, and Athanasian Creed) constitute the core of Anglican belief. But what exactly is a creed?

What is the difference between General Baptists and Particular Baptists? ›

The Particular Baptists adhered to the doctrine of a particular atonement—that Christ died only for an elect—and were strongly Calvinist (following the Reformation teachings of John Calvin) in orientation; the General Baptists held to the doctrine of a general atonement—that Christ died for all people and not only for ...

Who was the leader of the Baptists? ›

Baptist churches have their origins in a movement started by the English John Smyth and Thomas Helwys in Amsterdam.

Are Baptist and Anabaptist the same? ›

Anabaptists trace their heritage to the Radical Reformation of the 16th century. Other Christian groups with different roots also practice believer's baptism, such as Baptists, but these groups are not Anabaptist.

What religion is closest to Anglican? ›

Anglicanism was seen as a middle way, or via media, between two branches of Protestantism, Lutheranism and Reformed Christianity.

Why did Anglicans split from Episcopal Church? ›

Anglican Communion suspends the Episcopal Church after years of gay rights debates. For the first time, the global organizing body of Anglicans has punished the Episcopal Church, following years of heated debate with the American church over homosexuality, same-sex marriage and the role of women.

Why are people leaving the Episcopal Church? ›

The core issue for us is theological: the intellectual integrity of faith in the modern world. It is thus a matter of faithfulness to the lordship of Jesus, whom we worship and follow. The American Episcopal Church no longer believes the historic, orthodox Christian faith common to all believers.

Where does Anglican Church come from? ›

Origins. The roots of the Anglican Communion can be traced to the Reformation in the 16th century, when King Henry VIII rejected the authority of the Roman Catholic pope in Rome and established an independent church in England.

When was the Anglican Church founded? ›

Do Anglicans use rosary beads? ›

The term "rosary" comes from the Latin word "rosarius," which means bouquet or garland of roses. The connection between roses and Christian prayer beads is unknown. Catholics use a 59 bead rosary. Anglicans and other Protestants use a 33 bead rosary.

Why Anglicans should pray the rosary? ›

There are two core advantages to praying the Rosary: it assists in the practice of Christian meditation (though it is by no means the only resource) and. the use of the Hail Mary in the Rosary does help the Christian to constantly recall the Incarnation of Jesus Christ.

Does the Anglican Church do the rosary? ›

Anglican prayer beads, also known as the Anglican rosary or Anglican chaplet, are a loop of strung Christian prayer beads used chiefly by Anglicans in the Anglican Communion, as well as by communicants in the Anglican Continuum.

What do Anglicans believe about Jesus? ›

This opens in a new window. Trinitarian – Anglicans believe that there is One God who exists eternally in three persons—Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. Furthermore, we believe that Jesus Christ is completely God and is also completely human.

What Bible do Anglicans use? ›

The King James Bible, sometimes called the Authorized Version, is the primary translation approved for use by the Anglican church, and in most Protestant churches worldwide.

Do Anglicans believe in speaking in tongues? ›

Tongues are less associated with Anglicanism than with a form of Christianity known as "charismatic" . Many charismatic worshippers expect the work of the Holy Spirit to be seen in miracles and supernatural occurrences in their lives.

What do Strict Baptists believe? ›

The group of Strict Baptists called Strict and Particular Baptists are Baptists who believe in a Calvinist interpretation of Christian salvation.

What do Regular Baptists believe? ›

The Regular Baptists accept conservative theological interpretations of the Christian faith, including the belief in Christ's Second Coming. They require that the local churches in the General Association not participate in any cooperative church activities that include modernists.

How is Free Will Baptist different from Southern Baptist? ›

It traces its history back to Free Will, or Arminian, Baptists in the 18th century. These Baptists believed in free will, free grace, and free salvation, in contrast to most Baptists, who were Calvinists (i.e., who believed that Christ died only for those predestined to be saved).

Why are Baptists not allowed to dance? ›

Religious bans

Various Christian groups believe that dancing is either inherently sinful or that certain forms of dancing could lead to sinful thoughts or activities, and thus proscribe it either in general or during religious services.

What makes a Baptist a Baptist? ›

Baptist, member of a group of Protestant Christians who share the basic beliefs of most Protestants but who insist that only believers should be baptized and that it should be done by immersion rather than by the sprinkling or pouring of water.

What is a Baptist priest called? ›

The term "pastor", in the majority of Baptist churches, is one of two offices within the church, deacon being the other, and is considered synonymous with "elder" or "bishop" (though in Reformed Baptist churches, elders are a separate office).

Do Anabaptists believe Jesus is God? ›

Christology addresses the person and work of Jesus Christ, relative to his divinity, humanity, and work of salvation. The 16th-century Anabaptists were orthodox Trinitarians accepting both the humanity and divinity of Jesus Christ and salvation through his death on the cross.

What are Anabaptists called today? ›

Today the descendants of the 16th century European movement (particularly the Baptists, Amish, Hutterites, Mennonites, Church of the Brethren, and Brethren in Christ) are the most common bodies referred to as Anabaptist. Taken from: Anabaptist. (2007, May 12). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia.

What is the meaning of Anabaptist? ›

Anabaptist, (from Greek ana, “again”) member of a fringe, or radical, movement of the Protestant Reformation and spiritual ancestor of modern Baptists, Mennonites, and Quakers. The movement's most distinctive tenet was adult baptism.

Do Anglicans believe in being born again? ›

Anglicanism. The phrase born again is mentioned in the 39 Articles of the Anglican Church in article XV, entitled "Of Christ alone without Sin".

How are Anglicans different from Catholics? ›

The main difference between Anglican and Catholic is that Anglican refers to the church of England whereas Catholic comes from the Greek word that means 'universal'. The first form of Christianity is the Catholic. It also claims to have kept the apostolic leadership unbroken since the time of St. Peter.

What's the difference between Church of England and Anglican? ›

The Church of England is sometimes referred to as the Anglican Church and is part of the Anglican Communion, which contains sects such as the Protestant Episcopal Church. Each year, about 9.4 million people visit a Church of England cathedral.

Is Anglican Church Liberal? ›

The Church of England has, as one of its distinguishing marks, a breadth of opinion from liberal to conservative clergy and members. This tolerance has allowed Anglicans who emphasise the catholic tradition and others who emphasise the reformed tradition to coexist.

Is the Episcopal Church growing or declining? ›

Nationally, the Episcopal Church's membership peaked at 3.44 million members in 1959. It has been declining since the 1960s. “As of 2019, it had about 1.8 million, the Episcopal News Service reported in 2020. “Membership is down 17.4% over the last 10 years.”

What is an Episcopal priest called? ›

Archdeacons are episcopal vicars, which means that they are responsible for the pastoral and practical management of the diocese within their archdeaconry or specific area of responsibility. Not all member churches of the Anglican Communion have archdeacons.

Which church is losing the most members? ›

The Presbyterian Church has had the sharpest decline in church membership: between 2000 and 2015 they lost over 40% of their congregation and 15.4% of their churches. Infant baptism has also decreased; nationwide, Catholic baptisms are down by nearly 34%, and ELCA baptisms by over 40%.

Do Episcopalians confess to a priest? ›

Confession of sins to priests is not practiced in the Episcopal Church, but is an important element of the Catholic Church. The Episcopalians believe that saints are mere examples of what God wants them to be; in the Catholic's perspective, saints are to be asked for guidance as well.

What do Episcopalians believe happens after death? ›

It is believed that when a person dies, the Holy Spirit is released from the body to be returned to to God while the body is returned to the earth that had sustained it through life.

Why did the Anglican Church split from the Episcopal Church? ›

Anglican Communion suspends the Episcopal Church after years of gay rights debates. For the first time, the global organizing body of Anglicans has punished the Episcopal Church, following years of heated debate with the American church over homosexuality, same-sex marriage and the role of women.

Where did Anglican Church originated from? ›

Origins. The roots of the Anglican Communion can be traced to the Reformation in the 16th century, when King Henry VIII rejected the authority of the Roman Catholic pope in Rome and established an independent church in England.

What's the difference between Anglican and Catholic? ›

The main difference between Anglican and Catholic is that Anglican refers to the church of England whereas Catholic comes from the Greek word that means 'universal'. The first form of Christianity is the Catholic. It also claims to have kept the apostolic leadership unbroken since the time of St. Peter.

Are Anglicans Protestant or Catholic? ›

Anglicanism, one of the major branches of the 16th-century Protestant Reformation and a form of Christianity that includes features of both Protestantism and Roman Catholicism.

What's the difference between Church of England and Anglican? ›

The Church of England is sometimes referred to as the Anglican Church and is part of the Anglican Communion, which contains sects such as the Protestant Episcopal Church. Each year, about 9.4 million people visit a Church of England cathedral.

Who is the head of the Anglican Church? ›

Who is Justin Welby? Justin Welby became, in 2013, the 105th archbishop of Canterbury. He is the leader of the Anglican Communion, the worldwide body of Anglican Christian churches in communion with the see of Canterbury.

Why do Episcopalians cross themselves? ›

Making the sign of the cross is a sacramental gesture in a… More. Liturgy means “The Work of the People”! It's a way to be actively engaged during the service and connect with others!

Is the Episcopal Church growing or declining? ›

Nationally, the Episcopal Church's membership peaked at 3.44 million members in 1959. It has been declining since the 1960s. “As of 2019, it had about 1.8 million, the Episcopal News Service reported in 2020. “Membership is down 17.4% over the last 10 years.”

Is Anglican Church Liberal? ›

The Church of England has, as one of its distinguishing marks, a breadth of opinion from liberal to conservative clergy and members. This tolerance has allowed Anglicans who emphasise the catholic tradition and others who emphasise the reformed tradition to coexist.

Videos

1. Beth Moore: 'I Can No Longer Identify With Southern Baptists' | CBN News
(CBN News)
2. Safely Home | Beth Moore | Compelling - Part 5 of 5
(Living Proof Ministries with Beth Moore)
3. Are These False Prophets Pushing The Gospel Wrongly?
(BiblePower77)
4. 56: The Reshaping of the American Church. Guest: Bob Smietana
(Untangled Faith)
5. FALSE TEACHER BETH MOORE TURNS TO ANGLICANISM
(END TIME APOSTASY)
6. Beth Moore's wild unbiblical teachings: Michelle Lesley interview
(Doreen Virtue)
Top Articles
Latest Posts
Article information

Author: Rubie Ullrich

Last Updated: 01/30/2023

Views: 5731

Rating: 4.1 / 5 (52 voted)

Reviews: 91% of readers found this page helpful

Author information

Name: Rubie Ullrich

Birthday: 1998-02-02

Address: 743 Stoltenberg Center, Genovevaville, NJ 59925-3119

Phone: +2202978377583

Job: Administration Engineer

Hobby: Surfing, Sailing, Listening to music, Web surfing, Kitesurfing, Geocaching, Backpacking

Introduction: My name is Rubie Ullrich, I am a enthusiastic, perfect, tender, vivacious, talented, famous, delightful person who loves writing and wants to share my knowledge and understanding with you.