40 fire pit ideas – DIY brick, stone or gas designs for backyards, big and small (2022)

Table of Contents
Fire pit ideas to suit your backyard 1. Let it define the chill out zone 2. Weave yours into your coffee table 3. Add lanterns for a festival finish 4. Complement your fire pit with candles too 5. Create a view from the inside with a suspended design 6. Nod to all the camping vibes 7. Love the vintage look? Consider a weathered fire pit 8 . Couple up with containers for effect 9. Have it on the rocks 10. Keep it low key with a wrought iron design 11. This sturdy number will see you through many seasons 12. Match to your patio's aesthetics 13. Add interest with a small backyard fire pit 14. Gather round a matching set 15. Keep yours boho and mini-sized 16. Opt for portable beachside fun 17. If you love classic good looks 18. Invest in a design that has a double use 19. Elevate with a decorative design 20. Make it a trio for show 21. Go for bigger fire pit ideas and get more guests 22. Choose glass for a sleek look 23. Look out for alternative shapes 24. Go for gas and try a rectangular shape 25. Look for log storage and a fire pit all in one 26. Choose toasty but modern vibes 27. Sculpt your landscape with fire pits 28. Fire pit meets club Tropicana 29. Add a little glamour to a picnic 30. Fake it with your fire pit 31. Opt for slimline if your backyard is small 32. Live in a cooler climate? A gas fire pit will keep you cozy 33. Use a variety of furniture shapes around your fire pit 34. Consider which stones to use 35. Choose sleek and modern for a contemporary backyard 36. You can use fire pits undercover too 37. Compact designs work well in small backyards 38. If your backyard is bright white, then pick a matching fire pit 39. No backyard, but have a porch instead? No problem 40. Love a bit of DIY? Craft your own fire pit What do you put under a fire pit in your yard? How do I make a cheap outdoor fire pit? How deep should a backyard fire pit be? Is an outdoor fire pit worth it? Can you use wood in a fire pit? What should you not put in a fire pit? Are fire pits a good idea? FAQs Videos

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After some blazing fire pit ideas? A fire pit in your backyard is the epitome of conviviality and a must-have feature, not just in the summer months.

Beautiful and versatile in style, whether you have a small and modern-looking patio or a super spacious suburban courtyard, you'll be able to elevate the look of your space with our fire pit ideas below. And if you're looking to buy the best fire pit, we've got those to shop too.

You may love DIY and want to build your own out of brick or stone, but there are so many great concrete, cast iron, and even gas-fueled options out there to either blend seamlessly into your surroundings or make a statement in your outdoor living space.

Fire pit ideas to suit your backyard

Be inspired by the latest backyard fire pit ideas below and get ready for toasty evenings spent outdoors with your close ones.

1. Let it define the chill out zone

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(Image credit: Focus)

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Consider a wall-mounted fire pit and let it zone your backyard space, creating a little separation from say, splashes from the pool. This fire pit acts as a barbecue too and that surrounding disk is not only cool but will also protect your wall from ash and discoloration too.

This clever Sigmafocus (opens in new tab) design folds up when it's closed, so it takes up limited space making it ideal for a smaller backyard.

2. Weave yours into your coffee table

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(Image credit: Moda Furnishings)

A coffee table that doubles up not only as a fire pit but also as a drink cooler and barbecue... That's our kind of fire pit garden idea. Nod to luxury a little more by choosing the finishing rattan weave as above or surrounding fabric to suit your outdoor sofas and armchairs too.

Jonny Brierley, CEO of Moda Furnishings (opens in new tab) recommends, 'If you are hosting guests in your garden in the evening, make sure the fire pit is lit before guests arrive. This creates a wow factor as they step into the garden, and also helps them to relax more quickly.'

'Firelight is said to create a more intimate setting, allowing guests to relax and talk, letting their guards down at the end of the day. The fire provides a visual, psychological comfort from which you and your guests will benefit.'

3. Add lanterns for a festival finish

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(Image credit: Future + Fiona (bowen) Walker-Arnott T/a Fwa Photography)

This fire pit setup will make you feel like you've gone for the glam option at Glastonbury, or like you're living it up at Coachella. The light that fire, turn the music up and keep dreaming in your backyard.

4. Complement your fire pit with candles too

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(Image credit: Moda Furnishings + Sandra Baker (@the_idle_hands))

Adding candles and other sources of light to the fire pit mix is a surefire way (pun intended) to create a super cozy setup.

You don't need to go wild but pick out some easy garden lighting ideas to incorporate likea few candles and some fairy lights, and you will be loving those long evenings spent in your backyard (even on a school night).

5. Create a view from the inside with a suspended design

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(Image credit: Focus)

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Choose a statement piece that works wonders on the eye outside, and in. The elegant curves of this fire pit add a modern touch to the landscape in the background without overpowering the space at all.

For a similar design check out the Ergofocus (opens in new tab) which is an eye-catching floating, modern wood outdoor fireplace idea that maximizes heat efficiency by allowing you to rotate the fire 360 degrees.

6. Nod to all the camping vibes

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(Image credit: Getty Images)

If you want to go old school then choose a fit pit or learn how to build a fire pit yourself out of stone for a really authentic look.

Pitch close to trees or in another fairly open space with natural barriers, grab your best deck chairs, your guitar, and the marshmallows, and you have the cutest set up out there.

(Video) Super Easy Fire Pit build - DIY How to build a patio firepit - Little Known Tips, design & ideas

7. Love the vintage look? Consider a weathered fire pit

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(Image credit: LimeLace)

This Antalya (opens in new tab) large round fire pit has a sculptural feel, letting it warm up even the tiniest backyard spaces around. The rusted finish will blend into a more vintage-style home, and the extra height from the stand ensures it will become more of a focal point than other designs.

8 . Couple up with containers for effect

(Image credit: Lime Lace)

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If you're a big fan of container gardening and have many pots of plants on your patio, consider complementing their placement with a couple of fire pits in a similar shape. Having the repetition of form will make for a cool display and you could even create a stylish walkway from the patio door right through to your backyard.

These Bioethanol (opens in new tab) fire pits use an environmentally-friendly, renewable energy source that burns clean and gives the look of a real fire – without the hassle of burning wood and all the cleaning that comes with it, and they can be used inside too.

9. Have it on the rocks

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(Image credit: Getty Images)

Warm up your courtyard with this big ol' fire pit idea which adds warmth and coziness to what is quite an open space. Setting this on gravel creates a cool contrast to the fire pit's smooth exterior but nods to the textured interior also for an all-around streamlined, stylish look.

10. Keep it low key with a wrought iron design

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(Image credit: Marian Lousie Designs/Kaley Elaine )

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One way to create a more cohesive feel is to mimic the shape of your fire pit with your chair choices. In this instance the curvy shapes work together perfectly.

‘Backyard fire pits are an inexpensive way to add a "destination" to your outdoor space, surround it with a few cute outdoor chairs and watch your friends and family gather!’ says Mimi Meacham, founder and principal designer at Marian Louise Designs (opens in new tab).

11. This sturdy number will see you through many seasons

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(Image credit: Wayfair)

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Simple and modern, sure it's one of the most classic fire pit ideas going but sometimes basic works, right? The slimline tripod legs and open round top give this cast iron fire pit (opens in new tab) full marks for elegance – plus it's portable and small – so it makes a great addition to small backyard areas too.

12. Match to your patio's aesthetics

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(Image credit: Lime Lace)

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Looking at the colors and style of the best garden furniture you have before picking out your fire pit is a must.

Here the chunky and contemporary gray finish of this fire pit matches up so well with the paved patio, letting it stand out in an open and spacious backyard. We like the fiberglass-reinforced concrete here as it has a contemporary, minimalist look that will fit right on an urban patio idea.

13. Add interest with a small backyard fire pit

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(Image credit: Aldi)

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Tiny backyard areas look better and more spacious when fully kitted out, so contrast what you have on display already with a minimal but really fetching fire pit. Think about the frame's pattern and shape too for added interest in a contemporary small garden idea.

Wayfair's Adriel (opens in new tab) design is a good match for this backyard fire pit, its checkered style cut-out pattern makes a stunning light show when the sun's set.

14. Gather round a matching set

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(Image credit: Moda Furnithsings)

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Make it the center of attention by nestling your fire pit in the middle of your couches as a winning garden party idea, even in a small backyard space. The atmosphere here is on point and what better way to relax than by watching dancing flames and talking the night away with friends?

15. Keep yours boho and mini-sized

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(Image credit: Moreso)

(Video) Building Your Perfect Fire Pit on a Budget

Keep your fire pit scene laid back and relaxed using colorful bamboo seating, patterned outdoor rugs thrown on the floor and cushions galore for a 'woke up like this' setting.

16. Opt for portable beachside fun

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(Image credit: Arada)

This nifty little number is perfect if you have a beach within walking distance, or if not, you can jump in your car together with friends and family for a change of scene. Portable options are good and metal designs can acquire a rusty patina which will add to its character over the years.

17. If you love classic good looks

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(Image credit: Graham & Green)

Keep the chills at bay with a trad design crafted from cast iron, it’s hard-wearing and will develop a lovely patina from the fires and weather and the circular shape makes it ‘friendly’ to sit around - no sharp corners to catch your legs on. Its low profile means you can sit on cushions and have a more relaxed gathering around it.

18. Invest in a design that has a double use

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(Image credit: Firepits UK)

Fire pits that can be turned into a BBQ are always worth considering, and designs that have a detachable swinging BBQ arm that can be attached so you can get your kebabs sizzling and keep warm at the same time. What’s not to love? And how about this garden paving idea?

19. Elevate with a decorative design

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(Image credit: B&Q)

For a sculptural feel that will suit a modern backyard, consider a fire pit that has a decorative ‘cut out’ design. It’s a sure-fire talking point and it will certainly stand out from the usual fire pits. Oxidized designs will naturally rust and will add warmth visually to your backyard.

For a similar design check out this eye-catching Four Elements Spherical (opens in new tab) fire pit by Logi. It has a built-in ash pan and comes with a protective weather and heat resistant coating. Bespoke designs are an option too if you want a unique fire pit.

20. Make it a trio for show

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(Image credit: LimeLace)

Grouping items in three’s is a top styling trick, and if you fancy creating a design feature with your fire pits then this is one to remember. Portable fire pits are a great option as we’ve mentioned above - and none more so that a design that runs off bioethanol fuel which is renewable, burns clean and delivers a warm cozy heat.

21. Go for bigger fire pit ideas and get more guests

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(Image credit: Merge Studio and Ramsay Photography for Solus Decor)

Naturally, the more quests you entertain, the large the fire pit you’ll need, but it works the other way round too.

A fire bowl creates an instant gathering space and a design this size which is a good height and width will produce enough heat to keep the ambiance relaxed and your friends cozy warm during your al fresco dining. Just add one of the best BBQs and you're all set.

22. Choose glass for a sleek look

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(Image credit: Danetto)

How fabulous is this glass fire pit? It’s perfect for backyards and will be the focal point of your outdoor dining idea. There’s plenty of room around the edge of the fire section for plates, nibbles, and glassware and it has a wipeable glass top for ease of use.

If you love the idea of this kind of coffee table style then Wayfair's Lisdale (opens in new tab) is a good option.

23. Look out for alternative shapes

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(Image credit: Gardenesque)

A fire pit doesn’t necessarily mean a trad bowl shaped design, take this lantern style as an example. It’s a different option to consider if your home is an older property and not one that would suit an edgier more streamlined model. It directs the smoke upwards which can be a bonus, and it packs a punch heat-wise.

24. Go for gas and try a rectangular shape

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(Image credit: Solus Decor)

People are often torn between a classic wood-burning fire pit or cheating a little with gas. But the reality is that if you opt for a gas fire pit instead, it will mean not having to faff around with buying logs and cleaning out the ash the morning after.

Ideal if you don't have so much time on your hands, or logs on your doorstep for that matter. A slimline design is perfect for small backyards and they can be used to zone your space. Look out for styles that can be stacked - yes really - to add height or to create a ‘wall’.

25. Look for log storage and a fire pit all in one

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(Video) Cheap and Easy DIY Square Fire Pit - 11

(Image credit: Cuckooland)

We’re always fans of pieces that have a double use, so this fire pit that can store its own logs is a great backyard solution - especially if your space is on the small side. Use it as a focal point and create a circle with your chairs for a cozy feel.

26. Choose toasty but modern vibes

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(Image credit: Beaumonde)

There are some sleek designs to choose from if you fancy something a bit different. This high-backed ‘windscreen’ option will project the heat inwards and has been crafted from sheet iron. You can combine it with a cast-iron BBQ grid – get those smores roasting with the kids in all seasons.

27. Sculpt your landscape with fire pits

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(Image credit: Lime Lace)

A modern version of the classic campfire, this uber stylish Stix (opens in new tab) design can be used both indoors and outdoors. Made from brushed stainless steel it’s fueled by bioethanol that burns with a bright orange flame without producing smoke, soot or ash. This is a great option for those who are eco-conscious and don’t want to compromise on style.

28. Fire pit meets club Tropicana

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(Image credit: Solus Decor)

If the classic black metal styles don’t appeal, consider a design with a polished concrete white finish instead. It will reflect the light of the inner fire pit and a design this shape acts as a coffee table too. Perfect for normal chair height and it makes the perfect finishing touch in this tropical paradise-esque backyard space.

29. Add a little glamour to a picnic

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(Image credit: Moreso)

Fire pits create that fabulous atmosphere wherever they are placed - from a formal dining setting to a relaxed boho picnic in your backyard. Light it up in the evening as the temperature and light drop to create a welcoming, convivial atmosphere for family and friends alike.

30. Fake it with your fire pit

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(Image credit: Cuckooland)

Whether it’s friends over for a light lunch or a gathering in the evening, it’s useful to have a design that means you have space for plates too. And with that kind of setup you don’t necessarily want to have smoky food, so look for a design that’s gas fueled instead – ceramic logs can look mighty real these days...

31. Opt for slimline if your backyard is small

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(Image credit: Cuckooland )

If you’re not keen on the ‘open bowl’ type fire pit then consider this Kamino (opens in new tab) chiminea design. Its slimline shape makes it ideal for a backyard and another bonus is that it can be moved around easily depending on your entertaining needs.

Tall designs ensure that the smoke is pulled away from where you’re sitting, so no stinking eyes.

32. Live in a cooler climate? A gas fire pit will keep you cozy

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(Image credit: Cuckooland)

If you want to keep your fire pit outside all year round – let’s face it, it’s easier than having to store it – then choose a design that’s made from a tough material, like composite.

Another consideration is how much heat you want it to put out, gas is a good option and with the Bowl Cocoon Gas Fire Pit from Cuckooland (opens in new tab), you can adjust the flame height. This model also comes with a griddle plate so you can cook s’mores in the evening light too.

33. Use a variety of furniture shapes around your fire pit

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(Image credit: M.Lavender Interiors/Janet Mesic Mackie)

If your backyard has enough space then place your furniture so it’s not all on top of the firepit. It’s also worth mixing up the styles so you have some benches intermingled with chairs.

34. Consider which stones to use

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(Image credit: Living with Lolo/Life Created)

If you live in a warm climate then not only can you go lighter with your stone choice visually, but it’s worth considering the type of tiles you choose too:

‘This fire pit is custom-built by our landscapers on top of travertine pavers. We love using these in Arizona because they don't retain heat and are cool to the touch,’ says Lauren Lerner, founder and principal designer at Living with Lolo (opens in new tab).

(Video) How To Build a DIY Smokeless Fire Pit That Really Works!

35. Choose sleek and modern for a contemporary backyard

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(Image credit: Maestri Studio/Nathan Schroder)

Consider the shape of your fire pit and how it might work with the rest of your backyard furniture. There are plenty of squares and rectangles in this modern outdoor space which naturally guides you to choose similar. We love the use of symmetry – note the graphite gray design sits exactly in front of the doors.

36. You can use fire pits undercover too

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(Image credit: Kim Armstrong Interior Design/Michael Hunter)

‘I think a fire pit is absolutely worth it as outdoor living is becoming more and more common these days,’ says Kim Armstrong, co-founder and principal designer at Kim Armstrong Interior Design (opens in new tab).

‘Having a great place where you can gather around the fire, keep warm and just have the ambiance of the light is truly worth it, I found this fire pit on Wayfair.’

For similar, try this Latitude (opens in new tab) design.Complete the look with an outdoor kitchen area too.

37. Compact designs work well in small backyards

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(Image credit: Belgard Homescapes )

Match the size of your fire pit to the space you have available as balance is key. This round design from Solo Stove (opens in new tab) is ideal for backyards that are lacking in size. Circular models help the eye to flow around and are ‘friendly’ visually. Team it with other stainless steel accessories like lanterns for a cohesive feel.

38. If your backyard is bright white, then pick a matching fire pit

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(Image credit: Joshua Smith/Lance Gerber)

‘This fire pit was custom-designed when we renovated this project. We ran the gas line to this spot so there was no fussing with wood and overwhelming smoke. We also chose a circular shape for easier flow and gathering – and pulled in the texture from the exterior structure for cohesiveness and balance,’ says Joshua Smith, founder and principal designer at Joshua Smith Inc (opens in new tab).

39. No backyard, but have a porch instead? No problem

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(Image credit: Novogratz)

This nifty design by Novogratz (opens in new tab) is perfect for those who only have a small backyard or simply a porch.

It has a clever design as it’s made from durable, weather-resistant charcoal ceramic material that means it can be used all year round. It also has a cooking surface, mesh dome, steel lid and rain cover. Use it for chilling with your friends or let it double up as a BBQ.

40. Love a bit of DIY? Craft your own fire pit

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(Image credit: Belgard Hardscapes )

It is possible to make your own backyard fire pit, and you can buy kits like this flagstone fire pit kit (opens in new tab)

Ready to assemble, it can be placed on an existing patio and it comes with all the pieces and instructions. All you need to do is decide where to put it.

What do you put under a fire pit in your yard?

‘Building a fire pit takes a bit of prep work,’ says Joe Rabaine, director of Residential Hardscapes at Belgard (opens in new tab).

‘You need to make sure you have enough room in the desired area to accommodate the size of the fire pit and make sure the ground is stable. Once you have determined the location and stability, you can start excavation and base prep. Most fire pit kits require you add gravel for the base and moisten it slightly with water to aid with compaction.’

Robert Novogratz, co-founder and interior designer of The Novogratz (opens in new tab), adds:

‘Whether you are building a fire pit or just locating a ready-made one for your yard, you want to put it well away from structures and tree limbs and anything combustible, so not on your deck.’

How do I make a cheap outdoor fire pit?

‘Fire pit kits are a great option. They come with all the needed materials including paver stones, inserts, masonry adhesive, gravel and leveling sand. Purchasing all the materials together in a kit can help you save money and ensure you have all the supplies needed,’ says Joe Rabaine, director of Residential Hardscapes at Belgard (opens in new tab).

How deep should a backyard fire pit be?

‘The final elevation of your gravel should be about four feet below the finished height of the surrounding landscape,’ advises Joe.

Is an outdoor fire pit worth it?

'Oh it really is! It makes sitting outside more hospitable in every way and is the perfect place for family and friends to gather, roast marshmallows, have a drink and enjoy nature,’ says Robert.

Joe adds: ‘Fire pits are a great addition to your backyard. They can serve as a focal point in the space and maximize its functionality, serving as both a light and heat source – so you can enjoy the outdoors any time of year. Fire pits also add value to the home, especially if they are built into the yard or another feature, like a deck.’

Can you use wood in a fire pit?

If your fire pit of choice requires wood for fuel, Imbert recommends to only use hardwood and that it must be dry for optimal performance of your fire pit. 'It is essential to burn dry wood. The maximum moisture content for a log ready to burn is 20%. Depending on how it is stored, wood can be burned 18–24 months after it is cut.

The storage conditions for wood are very important. Wood should be stacked in a dry and well-ventilated location. Ideally, it should be stored under a cover, with the sides left open for sufficient ventilation. Do not place logs directly on the ground, but on pallets or wooden planks to allow air to circulate around them. If wood is not stored properly, it can become moist and thus burn less efficiently and emit pollutants as it burns.'

What should you not put in a fire pit?

Imbert notes to not confuse your fire pit with your rubbish bin, 'Waste and rubbish can rapidly transform the former to an incinerator producing unpleasant odours, not to mention the release of toxic gases into the atmosphere.'

Are fire pits a good idea?

We spoke with Dominique Imbert, Founder, Focus (opens in new tab) about the benefits of adding this feature to your home. 'By adding a new dimension to your outdoor space all year round, you can create an outdoor wellness zone for keeping warm, cooking or indeed as an escape from the indoors. You don’t even have to have acres of garden this can be achieved with a very small patch of ground.'

'A crackling fire with dancing flames are the perfect ingredients for lighting up a summer’s evening. Creating a designated zone for eating, reading, relaxing or simply keeping warm is the basis for atmospheric outdoor living and entertaining. Fire has the ability to transform a mood and create magical, memorable traces in time. Remember those moments of calm; the celebrations; a gourmet evening with friends and family - fire is so often a companion on these special occasions.'

FAQs

What is a good size fire pit for backyard? ›

The best size for a firepit is one that allows you to have a strong enough fire while allowing everyone to be close enough for conversation. A good rule of thumb is to have an inside diameter of 30 inches.

How do you build a fire pit on a budget? ›

My stones i'm using these stones to create a nice solid base for my. Firewood a little bit of sweat

How do you build a simple backyard fire pit? ›

  1. Step 1: Plan Location and Layout. A fire pit should be built at least 15 feet from any structure and close to a water source. ...
  2. Step 2: Determine the Size. ...
  3. Step 3: Dig a Hole. ...
  4. Step 4: Line Hole With Sand. ...
  5. Step 5: Add Base Row. ...
  6. Step 6: Place Metal Ring. ...
  7. Step 7: Insert Bricks into Fire Pit Floor. ...
  8. Step 8: Add Pea Gravel.

How do you make a big outdoor fire pit? ›

Set the blocks aside and remove the sod and dirt to a depth of 2 inches. Then tamp down the soil.

What shape fire pit is best? ›

Square fire pits tend to be the more efficient option in terms of space, making them much more suitable for smaller yards and patios. Seating layouts are also generally much simpler around a square fire pit, whether you go for permanent seating or moveable patio furniture.

Should a fire pit be in the ground? ›

Fire pits can be dug into the ground, but more typically modern fire pits are actually built above ground to a height between 12-14 inches. However, if you want to be able to use the edge of the fire pit as additional seating when it's not in use, a height of 18-20 inches will be more comfortable.

What do you put at the bottom of a fire pit? ›

What do you put in the bottom of a fire pit? You'll want to start with a layer of sand at the bottom of the pit, and then top the sand with gravel, lava rocks, fire pit glass, paving stones or even bricks for your fire pit. Alternatively, you can simply use dirt.

What do you put around a fire pit? ›

Gravel works well as a natural surrounding for a fire pit. It's a great material to lay down around your fire pit since it won't show any noticeable charring or ash stains if the fire is raging. Just don't put any gravel in the fire pit itself.

How deep should a fire pit be? ›

The hole should be 12 inches in diameter and 18 inches deep. Fill this hole with large gravel. If the soil doesn't drain well or there is heavy precipitation, dig a trench from the center out. If you're adding a drainpipe, dig about 10 feet from the fire pit.

Should I put sand in my fire pit? ›

The main benefits of using sand are that it helps to soak up the heat and evenly distribute the heat throughout the fire pit. Sand is also great for protecting the actual metal bowl from the intense heat the fire can put out. At the end of the day, there is no harm in putting sand in the base of a metal pit.

Does a fire pit need a liner? ›

If you're envisioning your fire pit as a permanent part of your backyard or patio, you'll definitely want to use a fire pit liner. Doing so can prevent you from spending time and money fixing cracked or damaged materials.

Do fire pits need drainage? ›

In-ground and metal fire pits need a drainage hole for water to drain out. If you have an open and in-ground fire pit in your backyard, you must have drainage for your fire pit. Otherwise, water will pool inside your fire pit causing it to rust. It can severely damage your fire pit burner making it difficult to light.

What kind of rock do you put around a fire pit? ›

Hard rocks like granite, marble, or slate are much denser, and therefore less likely to absorb water and explode when exposed to heat. Other rocks that are safe to use around and in your fire pit include fire-rate brick, lava glass, lava rocks, and poured concrete.

Do I need a metal ring for a fire pit? ›

If your fire pit is intended to be semi-permanent or temporary, an insert may not be entirely necessary. The use of a fire pit ring will assist in maintaining the structural integrity of your fire pit and the surface on which it sits all while protecting its long-term appearance.

Should you glue fire pit bricks? ›

Answer: To install a fire pit, all you need is your block of choice and LIQUID NAILS® FUZE*IT® All Surface Construction Adhesive (LN-2000) to get the job done. Liquid Nails FUZE*IT has an extreme temperature resistance, and will secure your blocks in place.

Which is better gas or wood fire pit? ›

You can get more heat from wood because it burns hotter than both propane and natural gas. This also means that outdoor cooking is easier to accomplish with wood burning applications than gas ones. There is nothing quite like the crackling sounds and rustic smells of a natural cedar burning fire place.

What is a good size for a rectangular fire pit? ›

Experts recommend a fire pit with an inside diameter of 36 to 44 inches to provide sufficient space for the fire while maintaining a close and safe distance between people around the fire. However, homeowners who want a fire pit for entertaining many guests can expand the dimension to a maximum of five feet.

What is the easiest fire pit to use? ›

Our favorite portable option is the FirePit+ from Biolite, which is by far the easiest fire pit to transport. With a lightweight frame (at just 20 pounds), collapsible legs, and carrying handles, you can set up the party anywhere.

Which is better in ground fire pit or above ground? ›

In the ground fire pits are often safer because they are smaller and contain the flames more than an above the ground fire pit. That said, they are also easier to fall into and so you have to be careful with little ones around.

Where should you put a fire pit in your backyard? ›

Fire pits should be placed on a level surface, no less than ten feet away from any structure, 20-25 feet or more is best, in a wide-open space, away from trees with low-hanging limbs, woodpiles, bushes, and other materials that could ignite if contact with a flame is made.

How far does a gas fire pit need to be from a house? ›

Place your fire pit at a safe distance (10-25 feet) from any flammable structures or surfaces. This includes your house, trees, shed, vehicle, neighbors' property, and wood deck, among other things. Keep your fire pit away from overhanging branches.

Why do you put rocks in the bottom of a fire pit? ›

A big advantage of stones is that you can use them as an additional layer of protection for the ground beneath the fire pit. For example, if you place stones above dirt or sand, this can act as an additional protective layer. Stones can also look very beautiful at the bottom of a fire pit.

How do you insulate the bottom of a fire pit? ›

Place some sand in the bottom of the fire pit. Sand will act as an insulator and help to disperse the heat more evenly. The grass underneath and surrounding your fire pit can still get quite warm from the heat of the fire, so giving it a water a few times throughout the night or in advance will help to cool it down.

What do you put under a fire pit on a deck? ›

Use Pavers Underneath the Fire Pit

There are specially made fire pit mats, which are made to withstand the extremely high temperatures a pit can reach. Or simply arrange pavers or bricks in the area where your fire pit will be placed. These will protect the deck from being damaged by high temperatures.

How do you make a fire pit look good? ›

Concrete tree rings make for a brilliant fire pit. Stack two or more tree rings on top of each other. Make a smaller circle using smaller concrete rings on the inside. You can place some stones or pebbles in between the two rings to make it look nicer and to give it a good finishing touch.

What type of gravel is best for a fire pit? ›

Pea gravel is great to add to a fire pit area because you don't have to be precise, it's comfortable to walk on, and it doesn't cost much per bag.

What do you put under a fire pit on grass? ›

Heat shields are another good option if a patio slab doesn't work. Heat shields can be used on your grass, wooden decks, concrete surfaces, and many other surfaces. Heat shields are portable and easy to assemble. You just place one under the fire pit on a flat surface, and light your fire without worry.

What is a Dakota fire Hole? ›

Introduction: Dakota Fire Hole

A Dakota Fire Hole is an underground fire that is ideal for heat, stealth camping, and high winds. Because the fire is underground, the flame doesn't have contact with the cold air so the ground acts as insulation for the fire making it hotter than a normal one.

Can u put a fire pit on grass? ›

Are you wondering if fire pits go on grass, and if so, how can you do it safely? Fire pits can be placed directly on top of grass. However, without proper precaution, there can be major damage to the grass. It is recommended to place a mat or other material underneath to avoid damage.

What can I use instead of firewood? ›

Sustainable alternatives for burning wood
  • Wood bricks, also called biomass bricks, are made from recycled sawdust and wood chips condensed into bricks and dried in a kiln. ...
  • Wood pellets can also be used for outdoor cooking and heating fire pits. ...
  • Soy and switchgrass logs are eco-friendly alternatives for burning wood.
2 Dec 2021

How big is too big for a fire pit? ›

Small fire pit dimensions should measure 3 feet wide, while a large pit can go up to 6 feet wide. Ideally a fire pit should be between 36 and 44 inches wide (including the width of the walls) in order to comfortably seat multiple people around it whilst still maintaining an intimate setting.

How much space do I need for a fire pit? ›

When you are planning your outdoor living space, you will want to carefully plan your fire pit to make sure there is enough room around it for everyone to be comfortable. A good guideline is to have about 7 feet of space around the fire pit. But that number may change depending on the type of seating you have.

How far does a fire pit need to be from a house? ›

Place your fire pit at a safe distance (10-25 feet) from any flammable structures or surfaces. This includes your house, trees, shed, vehicle, neighbors' property, and wood deck, among other things. Keep your fire pit away from overhanging branches.

What type of fire pit gives off the most heat? ›

Because they can produce a fire larger than a gas burner, wood pits are usually the best choice for the most heat.

What do you put at the bottom of a fire pit? ›

What do you put in the bottom of a fire pit? You'll want to start with a layer of sand at the bottom of the pit, and then top the sand with gravel, lava rocks, fire pit glass, paving stones or even bricks for your fire pit. Alternatively, you can simply use dirt.

What is the best height for a fire pit? ›

A good rule of thumb is to make an above-ground fire pit 12-14 inches tall. This is a few inches shorter than standard patio furniture seat height. If you want to be able to sit on the edge of the pit itself go a bit higher, 18-20 inches will be comfortable.

Does a fire pit need a liner? ›

If you're envisioning your fire pit as a permanent part of your backyard or patio, you'll definitely want to use a fire pit liner. Doing so can prevent you from spending time and money fixing cracked or damaged materials.

What do you put around a fire pit? ›

Gravel works well as a natural surrounding for a fire pit. It's a great material to lay down around your fire pit since it won't show any noticeable charring or ash stains if the fire is raging. Just don't put any gravel in the fire pit itself.

What is the best gravel to use around a fire pit? ›

Pea gravel is great to add to a fire pit area because you don't have to be precise, it's comfortable to walk on, and it doesn't cost much per bag. Cover the entire weed block fabric with the pea gravel.

How wide should a fire pit seating area be? ›

The width of the fire pit wall should be a minimum of eight inches for seating, but 12 to 18 inches is better. If you do use the wall as seating, build the pit wide enough that anyone seated on the wall is 24 to 36 inches from the blaze itself.

Can you use Duraflame logs in a fire pit? ›

These 100% renewable duraflame firelogs are specially designed and tested for roasting campfire foods like marshmallows and hot dogs. These wood-like crackling fire logs product less smoke and provide an ideal outdoor fire experience in fire pits, outdoor fireplaces, campfires, beach fires and more!

Where should you not put a fire pit? ›

Before striking the match, never place a pit closer than 10 feet from anything flammable, including your house and overhead tree branches. Unless the owner's manual says it's okay, don't put the pit on a grassy surface, wood deck, or enclosed porch.

Is it safe to put mulch around a fire pit? ›

Is it safe to put a (small, contained) fire pit on grass or mulch? Yes, you can use any fire pit at any time on the ground. If the fire pit is placed in a wooden or metal grate, it should always be covered with sand, rocks or gravel to prevent sparks from escaping.

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